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Latest Additions May 18, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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I like books, and I like bars (though I’m not partaking in adult beverages these days because I’m pregnant).  You know what would be cool?  Talking about books in bars!  This last Friday I had the opportunity to do just that with a few of my coworkers.  We had a few birthdays to celebrate, and as a bunch of librarians, it’s only natural that our conversation gravitated to what we were reading.  Though the atmosphere was very loud, it was easy for us to all be engaged in a conversation about what we were currently reading.   One of the neatest things for me was how broad our reading tastes spanned.  Some of us were reading nonfiction, some were reading classics, and some were reading contemporary fiction. None of us were reading the same book, or even the same author.   And as we wrap up our current reads, you’ll be able to fine them featured in the weekly latest additions post.  So, let’s see what we have already finished and recently added to the Reading Room.


second deadly sin
The Second Deadly Sin by Asa Larsson
Place  a hold

we are not ourselves
We are Not Ourselves by Matthew Thomas
Place a hold

where all the light tends to go
Where All Light Tends to Go by David Joy
Place a hold

god help the child
God Help the Child by Toni Morrison
Place a hold

hush hush
Hush Hush: A Tess Monaghan Novel by Laura Lippman
Place a hold

That’s what we have for our most recent additions to the Reading Room. Stay tuned over the next few weeks to see what books we were talking about at the bar.

Happy reading!

—Beth

News from the Reading World May 14, 2015

Posted by Dori in Book Discussion, Debut Author, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction.
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If you are both a literature and information junkie like me, there’s a new website on the block called Literary Hub. Culling through everything literature related on the web, it selects the best and brightest and offers it up for browsing or some in-depth exploration. It focuses on literary fiction and nonfiction, contains essays, interviews, news, book excerpts and even commissions original works. I know I’ll be getting lost in its pages.

parisspeculationThe Library Reads selections for June are out, so if you want to get a jump on the books Librarians are looking forward to, check it out. I have The Little Paris Bookshop and The Book of Speculation on my nightstand (maybe because both are about books, reading and there’s even a Librarian? Maybe…but no judgement please!)

The Indie Next List of books recommended by Independent Bookstores is another good place to find your next read. I’ve read The Luckiest Girl Alive, a twisty tale with a fierce protagonist who’s tragic past is slowly fire uncovered, and my colleagues are raving about Lisa Lutz’s new, and different for her, book How to Start a Fire.  The Given World, Girl at War and The Book of Aron, beautifully written novels about war and its devastating effects, may appeal to readers of All the Light We Cannot See and The Constellation of Vital Phenomena. I’d also like to read Irish author Anne Enright ‘s new book and I’ve heard great things about The Church of Marvels. Where to start?

Get thee reading – and if you need more suggestions, call us – we’re fellow book lovers who are here to help.

~ Dori

Latest Additions May 11, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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Do you find yourself often thinking you need a weekend to recover from your weekends?  I’ve thought that a few times myself, but I also like to think that if this is the case, I’m just doing weekends right.  This weekend was one of those perfect weekends where the weather cooperated, I got in quality time with my quality friends and family, and I got to eat some delicious food.  Those perfect weekends keep me itching for more time to do whatever I please, but the limited time also makes me cherish each walk, book, nap, and conversation that much more.

Are you looking for a few books to read for next weekend?  Check out some of our latest additions to the Reading Room.

miss julia
Miss Julia Lays Down the Law by Ann B. Ross
Place a hold

mrs grant
Mrs. Grant and Madame Jule by Jennifer Chiaverini
Place a hold

murder by the book
Murder by the Book by Eric Brown
Place a hold

shoeless joe
Shoeless Joe by W.P. Kinsella
Place a hold

Magicians lie
The Magician’s Lie by Greer Macallister
Place a hold

Happy reading!

—Beth

Pretty as a -Graphic Novel- Picture May 4, 2015

Posted by stacey in Book Discussion, Genre Book Discussion, Graphic Novel.
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Graphic novels are one of the best categories ever -especially if you’re limited on the amount of time you have to read!! There was plenty of variety in topics and plenty of variety in the amount of words people chose to read, from almost none (me!) to lots and lots (???), but the overall degree of satisfaction with individual choices was pretty darn high. So if you want a suggestion of a story told primarily through pictures, this list is for you!

Chris: Can’t We Talk about Something More Pleasant? A Memoir by Roz Chast takes us on a journey some of us know all too well—being there for our aging parents in the final years of their lives. I laughed and cried reading it and realizing how similar the human experience is whether one’s parents live in the Bronx or Garfield Heights. Who knew their maddening idiosyncrasies would be so similar in nature and so cherished after their passing? A winner of many awards including 2014 National Book Award Finalist, it’s a great read.

Carol: Race to Incarcerate: A Graphic Retelling by Sabrina Jones and Marc Mauer is an adaptation of a 1999 work by Marc Mauer. This nonfiction graphic novel looks at how the United States came to have the highest incarceration rate in the world with a population of over 2 million prisoners. With various stories of incarcerated individuals serving as examples, this statistic-filled book shows the failure of our prison system. Mauer suggests that by investing in education, drug treatment, job creation, and a fairer system of sentencing, the need for prisons would lessen.

Lauren: The Sculptor by Scott McCloud is a lengthy graphic novel (nearly 500 pages) but it gives its author plenty of time to draw out (ha! pun intended?) the story of a struggling artist, David Smith, taunted by the absence of what, he believes, should by now be a wildly successful career in sculpture. The story takes a fantastic turn when David makes a deal with Death: he will receive the power to sculpt anything around him into a masterwork just using his hands. The trade-off?—he has just 200 days more to live. Initially the agreement seems acceptable to David, but everything changes when he falls in love.

Lauren (again! -She loved them both!): Princess Decomposia and Count Spatula by Andi Watson is a delightful graphic novel geared towards young adults. The story takes us into the underworld and is populated by monsters and ghouls of every sort. Poor Princess Decomposia is left to handle all the official palace duties while he hypochondriac father, the King, remains in bed with a new ache, pain, or general complaint daily. Things start to look up for Princess Decomposia when newly hired palace cook, Count Spatula, enters her life. Count Spatula opens Decomposia up to new ideas about food, friendship, and true love. A charming read!

Beth: How to Be Happy by Eleanor Davis is a beautifully crafted graphic novel representing the extremes that humans take in desperate attempts to find happiness. The cover images and many of the included graphics are so beautiful that I feel they deserve to be framed the my wall, rather than shoved between other books on the shelf. The stories seemed to be deep if you gave them some thought, though none of them really grabbed me. It’s worth a look just for the art.

Julie: I “read” Love: The Tiger by Frederic Brremaud, illustrated by Federico Bertolucci, and I’m air quoting because the book’s only words are brief writing at the beginning and end of the story. It shows us a day in the life of a tiger searching for food and the illustrations are, for the most part, incredibly beautiful and as lush as the jungle they depict. It’s a world in which, according to the book, is experienced “an elemental love. A love that mankind can never experience.” I know I didn’t experience it, but it’s worth checking out simply for the illustrations.

Emma: March: Book One is the first in a projected graphic novel trilogy by John Lewis, U.S. Representative for Georgia’s 5th congressional district. He is the sole surviving member of the “Big Six” of the Civil Rights movement and was one of the original Freedom Riders. The graphic novel has Congressmen Lewis sharing Civil Rights history with a couple of young visitors to his office on the day of President Obama’s first inauguration. He begins with his early years in segregated rural Alabama through the birth of the Nashville Student Movement in the early 60’s. An important period of history told in a unique format.

Steve: White Death, by Robbie Morrison and Charlie Adlard, focuses on Italian WWI soldier Pietro Aquasanta and his time in the war. The story is bleakly told and drawn, and centers around the use of “White Death,” which was the purposeful setting off of avalanches using gun and cannon fire to destroy the enemy. Unfortunately the story itself is hard to follow, in part because the characters seem to look all the same, and partly because it is just plain disjointed.

Dori : In Persepolis by MarJane Satrapi, Satrapi illustrates the story of her childhood in Iran after the fall of the Shah in 1979. Her family, hailing from the educated elite, had been protesting the Shah and his violent and undemocratic methods of dealing with adversaries. After the country is turned into an Islamic state, her family is hopeful, but soon the Iraq War begins and it becomes clear that the new regime is deeply dangerous . Satrapi, 10 at the time, can no longer listen to Western music, dress how she likes or go to school with boys, and her extended family faces peril, including her beloved Uncle Anoosh. No wallflower, she often gets in trouble for speaking her mind and her parents, concerned for her safety, find a way to send her to Vienna to boarding school, telling her that they will soon follow. Beautifully illustrated in simple planes of black and white, Satrapi is able to capture individuals and their feelings with simplicity. Her text, too, is sparse, but captures the complexities of life in Iran under the Islamic regime.

Megan: Ms. Marvel Vol. 1: No Normal by G. Willow Wilson introduces a new superhero for the modern age. Kamala Khan is just an average teen from New Jersey when she suddenly finds herself possessing the superpowers that allow her to morph into her hero, Carol Danvers. Now she finds herself stuck between her two conflicting worlds. On the one hand, she longs for freedom from her strict, traditional Muslim parents on the other, she discovers she is not quite comfortable being Carol Danvers. As she explores the extent of her powers she learns how to be comfortable in her own skin. This new addition to the Marvel family is getting plenty of buzz due to the fact that Kamala is their first Muslim hero to headline her own comic, but Kamala is so much more than her religion and her skin tone. She is a charming and normal teenager just trying to figure things out. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for the new Ms. Marvel!

Stacey: I am Pusheen the Cat, by Claire Belton relies heavily on super cute images to reveal the charm of large fluffy cats -surprise! Pusheen and her little sister Stormy have plenty of adventures, apart and together. If you’re looking for something not too taxing on the brain but plenty of aww! -this one’s for you!

Now we’re back to lots of words on the page with Women’s Fiction! If you want to read along with us, please find a book that focuses on a female protagonist and her relationships with those around her. The main theme of the story should be of a woman overcoming a crisis and emerging triumphant. You go girl! (I know, I know but -I had to!)

Enjoy!
Stacey

Latest Additions May 4, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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May is one of my favorite months of the year.  It might be because my husband and I both celebrate our birthdays today, but it might also have something to do with the weather.  The temperature is rising, the flowers are blooming, and the scent of fresh cut grass is always in the air.  Spring is my favorite time of the year for working in the yard, grilling in the evening, and devouring books in the hammock.

If you too are ready to devour some good reads in the hammock, may I suggest you take a gander at our most recent additions to the Reading Room.

florence gordon
Florence Gordon by Brian Morton
Place a hold

hausfrau
Hausfrau byJill Alexander Essbaum
Place a hold

hearthreak

Heartbreak Hotel by Deborah Moggach
Place a hold

into the wild
Into the Wild by Jon Krakauer
Place a hold

lies that bind
Lies That Bind by Maggie Barbieri
Place a hold

Have a great day!

Happy reading!

—Beth

Latest Additions April 27, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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Often people will ask in passing “How are you?” and in passing I will reply “living the dream,” which is usually the case.  I have an amazing family, husband, friends, and job.  I try to not forget how lucky I am.  But sometimes when I say “living the dream,” what I really mean is “living in a dream,” because I’m half asleep.  I used to pride myself on my strong ability to sleep soundly for many hours, but life has new plans for me.   This may be the universe’s way of preparing me for motherhood, or punishment for getting too much sleep in my twenties.  Regardless, if I’m living the dream or living in a dream, life is still pretty great.

You know what else is pretty great?  Curling up with a great read.  Here are some of our most recent additions to the Reading Room:

witch hunter's tale
The Witch Hunter’s Tale: A Midwife Mystery by Samuel Thomas
Place a hold

those who wish me dead

Those Who Wish Me Dead by Michael Koryta
Place a hold

trouble shooter
Trouble Shooter by Louis L’Amour
Place a hold

Under a painted sky
Under a Painted Sky by Stacey Lee
Place a hold

Dorothy Parker
Dorothy Parker Drank Here by Ellen Meister

I hope you are also living the dream, or living in a dream.  If not, any of these books could be a great escape!

Happy reading!

—Beth

Latest Additions April 20, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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April has been a very exciting month to be a Clevelander.   This past weekend the city hosted the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony.  Not only was it an awesome concert right here in our city, but the awesome seemed to spread throughout the city as rock stars were spotted at local restaurants.  We weren’t all lucky enough to have dinner at the table next to Joan Jett, but it was still fun to hear stories about it.  It was also very exciting to watch the Cavs beat the Celtics as they start their journey through the 2015 playoffs.  I’m not usually a huge sports fan, but over the last six years I’ve found myself much more infatuated with the Cavaliers and I would love to see them bring a championship to the city.

The final exciting event coming to the beautiful Cleveland suburb of Rocky River is the Rocky River Public Library Book Festival, which will take place Saturday, April 25.  This is an exciting opportunity for all of us to get to meet and greet some of our favorite local authors.

With all the excitement I almost forgot to mention our latest additions to the Reading Room. So, let’s get back to what we are here for and start viewing the latest additions!

how to start a fire

How to Start a Fire by Lisa Lutz
Place a hold

mrs. grant
Mrs. Grant and Madame Jule
Place a hold

shoeless joe
Shoeless Joe by W.P. Kinsella
Place a hold

mark of midnight
The Mark of the Midnight Manzanilla by Lauren Willig
Place a hold

sweetheart
The Sweetheart by Angelina Mirabella
P
lace a hold

It seems that somewhere between the historical fiction and sports fiction, this list includes something for everyone.  I hope you find the perfect book to wrap up this month with.

Happy reading!

—Beth

Happy Anniversay – Library of Congress April 18, 2015

Posted by Emma in Uncategorized.
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library-of-congress-logo

On April 24, 1800 Congress approved an act providing “for the purchase of such books as may be necessary for the use of Congress…and for fitting up a suitable apartment for containing them.”

The Library of Congress (http://www.loc.gov) is the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and serves as the research arm of Congress. Comprised of three buildings: The Thomas Jefferson Building, the James Madison Building and the John Adams Building, it is the largest library in the world containing millions of books, recordings, photographs, maps and manuscripts in its collection.

 seal

The End of the Civil War – April 1865 April 16, 2015

Posted by Emma in Uncategorized.
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 Surrender  – Appomattox, Virginia – April 9, 1865

appomattox

Using the parlor of Wilmer McLean’s home, Robert E. Lee, commanding general of the Army of Northern Virginia, surrendered his men to Ulysses S. Grant, general-in-chief of all United States forces. Lee’s surrender signaled the end of the Southern states’ attempt to create a separate nation. Three days later the men of the Army of Northern Virginia marched before the Union Army, laid down their flags, stacked their weapons, and began the journey back to their homes. This was a new beginning for the nation.

5 Days Later – April 14, 1865 – Lincoln Assassinated

lincoln

President Abraham Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth while watching a performance of “Our American Cousin” at Ford’s Theatre, Washington D.C. He died the following day.

The library subscribes to a variety of engaging history magazines.

You’re invited to stop by and check out –

American History

American Spirit

Civil War Times

Military History

Smithsonian

Timeline

~Emma

Latest Additions April 13, 2015

Posted by Beth in Fiction.
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Happy National Library Week!
National Library Week is held from April 12-18.  This year the theme is “Unlimited possibilities @ your library®.” I think that should be the theme every year, because that really is what libraries have always meant to me.  Every since I was a child I have held the library in the highest regard.   The stacks seemed a lot taller then, but the endless rows up books are still a wonder of all information.  When I was an undergraduate I worked as a periodicals assistant at the university library.  That meant I was responsible for shelving the last twelve months of peer-reviewed journals.   It was eye opening to discover how many possible fields of study I could pursue.  It turns out that I couldn’t pick one, so I decided I’d like to spend the rest of my professional career with constant access to as much information as possible.  That’s how I found myself here today.

Libraries still hold a very special place in my heart.  I collect library cards from all over the state, and I often find myself inside unfamiliar buildings exploring libraries when I travel. I’ll be spending my week maxing out my borrowed items on as many library cards as possible, being grateful that I live in Ohio, where I have access to all of the public libraries in the state. If you are looking for a few ways to celebrate National Library Week, check out some of these latest additions, and stop by the Adult Reference Desk in our Grand Reading Room to enter yourself in our National Library Week giveaway.

Bloodsucking fiends
Bloodsucking Fiends by Christopher Moore

Descent
Descent by Tim Johnston

Florence Gordon
Florence Gordon by Brian Morton

Gabi girl in pieces
Gabi, A Girl in Pieces by Isabel Quintero

Glory O Brien
Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future by A.S. King

Have a happy National Library Week!

Happy reading,

—Beth

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