New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

There are many exciting new book releases coming and you don’t want to miss it…

Cover image for Pianos and flowers : brief encounters of the romantic kind

Pianos and Flowers: Brief Encounters of the Romantic Kind by Alexander McCall Smith – An anthology of 14 stories by the best-selling author of the No. 1 Ladies’ Detective Agency series imagines the rich lives and loves behind everyday people featured in pictures from the London Sunday Times photograph archives.

Cover image for Before she disappeared : a novel

Before She Disappeared by Lisa Gardner – Investigating the cold-case disappearance of a Haitian teen in a gritty Boston neighborhood, Frankie Elkin navigates resident and police resistance as well as the challenges of her own sobriety before risking her life to uncover the truth.

Cover image for In the garden of spite : a novel of the black widow of La Porte

In the Garden of Spite: A Novel of the Black Widow of La Porte by Camilla Bruce – A novel of feminine rage looks at one of the most prolific female serial killers in American history and the men who drove her to it.

Cover image for Shiver

Shiver by Allie Reynolds – A reunion weekend in the French Alps turns deadly when five friends discover that someone has deliberately stranded them at a remote mountaintop resort during a snowstorm, where ominous things begin to happen.

Cover image for Till murder do us part : true-crime thrillers

Till Murder Do Us Part  by James Patterson – A woman begins to suspect that her husband isn’t actually who he says he is and a teenager has her life upended during the hunt for a missing girl in two true-crime stories from the prolific and best-selling author.

Land: How the Hunger for Ownership Shaped the Modern World by Simon Winchester – The author of The Perfectionists explores the concept of land ownership and how it has shaped history, examining how people fight over, steward and occasionally share land, and what humanity’s proprietary relationship with land means for the future.

Knock Knock by Anders Roslund – The #1 international-bestselling thriller that tells the story of a police inspector and a former criminal informant in a race against time as they attempt to unravel past and present secrets.

The Divines by Ellie Eaton – Piecing together memories from her teen years at an elite English boarding school, Josephine gradually exposes a violent secret behind why the once-prestigious institution abruptly closed in disgrace.

With Her Fist Raised: Dorothy Pitman Hughes and the Transformative Power of Black Community Activism by Laura L. Lovett – Presents the first biography of Dorothy Pitman Hughes, a trailblazing black feminist activist whose work made children, race, and welfare rights central to the women’s movement.

Thyroid Reset Diet, The: Reverse Hypothyroidism and Hashimoto’s Symptoms with a Proven Iodine-Balancing Plan by Alan Christianson – The integrative physician and author of the best-selling The Metabolism Reset Diet outlines a recipe-complemented, counterintuitive plan for reversing the symptoms of thyroid disease through strategic food replacements that regulate iodine intake.

~Semanur

Books on Democracy and Government

It sure seems like 2020 is back from the dead to plague us in the new year, doesn’t it? If you, like me, would like a refresher on democracy and how our government works, I’ve chosen some books that will educate and inform.

Click any of the book covers below to be taken to our catalog, where you can request a copy of the book with your library card number and PIN. We’ve also included links to our e-media services Overdrive and Hoopla where available. 

The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton

Plato’s Republic

Democracy in One Book Or Less:
How It Works, Why It Doesn’t, and Why Fixing It Is Easier Than You Think 
by David Litt

You Call This Democracy? How to Fix Our Government
and Deliver Power to the People
by Elizabeth Rusch

Twilight of Democracy: the Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism
by Anne Applebaum

A User’s Guide to Democracy: How America Works
by Hannah McCarthy and Nick Capodice

A User's Guide to Democracy catalog link

Surviving Autocracy by Masha Gessen

Discover Winter Indoors & Out @RRPL

It’s a new month, a new year, with Winter and the long months of January and February providing a time to either snuggle in for contemplation and calm, or to go outdoors for a chilly adventure. Either way, here are a few books, tips, and links that can guide your journey.

If you want to stay in and stay warm, you can get through the Winter by cooking: bake a pie, sip a hot toddy, roast some vegetables or make a pot of soup. There’s a resurgence of fondue recipes – who can resist dipping things into a big pot of cheese?

What about crafting, putting together food for the birds, learning knitting, or making paper snowflakes?Wouldn’t it be fun to make homemade valentines this year? RealSimple has some punny ideas for adults.

Self-care is essential right now: burn some scented candles, enjoy a bubble bath, drink tea and read (always recommended), try a few puzzles (come and get one at the library) or word games. You just need a blanket, and some fuzzy slippers. It’s also time for some resolutions – they don’t need to be about change, but can just be about learning – taking on a new hobby, signing up for an online class, participating in a book club, or starting seeds from scratch.

If you’re game to venture outdoors, go hiking! The Cleveland Metroparks is beautiful this time of year and they even have a Winter Bucket List that you can participate in!

Grab your binoculars and find what birds live in your neighborhood. While you’re out and about, try to identify animal tracks. Or go out at night and learn about the constellations.

The next time it snows, go take a look at snowflakes up close. Then return inside, snug with a cup of hot chocolate, and read the book Snowflake Bentley, a lovely book about the man who first photographed snowflakes.

The Winter might be long, but there is so much to do!

~ Dori

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here some of the new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

In Case You Get Hit By a Bus: A Plan to Organize Your Life Now For When You’re Not Around Later by Abby Schneiderman/ Adam Seifer/ Gene Newman – A practical guide based on first-person experience with sudden loss shares advice for how to protect loved ones through proactive legal measures, discussing such topics as personal finances, funeral arrangements and legal safeguards.

Growing Under Cover: Techniques for a More Productive, Weather-Resistant, Pest-free Vegetable Garden by Niki Jabbour – Best-selling author Niki Jabbour provides an essential, in-depth guide to creating controlled growing spaces for productive vegetable gardening, using row covers, shade cloth, low tunnels, cold frames, hoop-houses, and more.

Friendshipping: The Art of Finding Friends, Being Friends, and Keeping Friends by Jenn Bane/ Trin Garritano/ Jean Wei – Humorous and sincere, this book of advice, illustrated throughout, presents the tips and tools readers need to make new friends and improve the quality of existing friendships.

Knit Happy With Self-Striping Yarn: Bright, Fun and Colorful Sweaters and Accessories Made Easy by Stephanie Lotven – The knitwear designer and the founder of Tellybean Knits shows knitters and crafters of any level how to incorporate playful whimsy into sweaters, hats, gloves and more through multi-color stripes and shapes.

Plant Partners: Science-Based Companion Planting Strategies for the Vegetable Garden by Jessica Walliser – Reflecting the latest research on how plants influence and communicate with each other, the author offers a research-based guide to companion planting&;a gardening method that uses strategic plant partnerships to improve crop yields and outsmart pests.

1000 Japanese Knitting & Crochet Stitches by Nihon Vogue & Gayle RoehmThis book is a treasure trove of needlecraft patterns and motifs for experienced knitters and crocheters seeking to create and better understand the infinite variety of their craft. This Japanese reference work is beloved by knitters the world over, and the English version will allow even more crafters to enjoy these techniques.

Rick Steves Istanbul: With Ephesus & Cappadocia by Lale Surmen Aran & Tankut Aran – A comprehensive guide to exploring Istanbul, from domed churches and mosques to Turkish baths and whirling dervishes, including top sights and hidden gems, the best places to eat and sleep, detailed neighborhood maps, packing lists and a phrase book.

The Great British Baking Show: Love to Bake by Paul Hollywood / Prue Leith – The Great British Baking Show: Love to Bake Throughout the book, judges’ recipes from Paul and Prue will hone your skills, while lifelong favorites from the 2020 bakers offer insight into the journeys that brought the contestants to the Bake Off tent and the reasons why they – like you – love to bake.

~Semanur~

Dori’s Top Ten of 2020

Yikes – what a year, right? I’ve been caught between not being able to focus on reading at all, with my concentration as slippery as an eel, and total and complete immersion in a book, with a desire to never leave!

What that means in terms of the quantity of books read is that I did not read a lot, but those that I did read I sunk into and they felt like the perfect book to read at the time. Lots of historical fiction, a graphic novel, essays about nature and climate change, and an endearing fable all provided me with an outlet, an escape, or an insightful way to get through this year. I hope you found similar ways to take your mind off 2020. Here’s to getting to 2021!

Hamnet: a Novel of the Plague by Maggie O’Farrell: a story about the family of William Shakespeare and the death of his young son, Hamnet, from the plague. The best of historical fiction, O’Farrell tells us the story from multiple perspectives, focusing on Shakespeare’s wife, Agnes.

The Mirror & the Light by Hilary Mantel: sad, but expected, the fascinating trilogy about Thomas Cromwell had to end, but it was a riveting journey.

Weather by Jenny Offill: I read this early in pandemic shutdown time and it just was a perfect fit – a meditative look at a woman and her family and her future; funny and prescient.

Optic Nerve by Maria Gainza: this is the kind of book that I love – it’s narrated by an art historian in Argentina and each chapter she talks about a piece of art that she’s affected by and weaves the story of the artist and artwork into stories about her life and family in Argentina.

Perestroika in Paris by Jane Smiley: ok, this may seem like a silly book, a book with talking animals, but it’s not at all cheesy, or sickly sweet. It’s Smiley writing well, a lovely story about what all of us need, love, freedom, respect, and to dream.

Run Me to Earth by Paul Yoon: I love Yoon’s writing; his latest is set in Cambodia and we see the effects of the U.S. bombing of Cambodia during the Vietnam War through the eyes of the 3 friends.

Trieste by Dasa Drndic: I picked this up because it was on my list to discard from the collection, then I read about it and took it home and became immersed in the story. I have read many things about the Holocaust, but this one has a new perspective – it’s fiction, but uses historical facts to tell the story of the Holocaust in Northern Italy and children removed from their parents. Challenging but worth it.

Sapiens: A Graphic History, The Birth of Humankind (Vol. 1) by Yuval Noah Harari, Daniel Casanave,  and David Vandermeulen: This book is based on the author’s book Sapiens, which I never read (but should now) and is volume 1 of the story of the evolution of humanity – clever and eye-opening.

Writers & Lovers by Lily King: King’s Euphoria was a favorite of mine a few years back; this one is altogether different – set in the present, a woman writer finding her way.

Vesper Flights by Helen MacDonald: MacDonald’s H is for Hawk took the world by storm and this new book of collected essays continues with her focus on the natural world and climate change, with glorious writing to boot.

A joyful holiday season to all –

~ Dori