Bicycling with Butterflies Read-alikes: One Book, One City

Have you been loving Bicycling with Butterflies by Sara Dykman? Perhaps you finished it already and are looking for something similar to read? As someone who admittedly doesn’t read much non-fiction, this book inspired me to consider adding more nature focused non-fiction titles to my ever growing to-read pile.

Below you’ll find some suggested read-alike titles, including some stellar nature and travel writing.

You can request a title through our online catalog here or check out our digital collection offerings through OverDrive!

More Native Plant News

Last week I suggested a few sources for native plants. This week, I’m going to share some resources so you can learn more about native plants, which are the best for this area, and how to plant them – do they need sun? shade? clay soil or wet soil? What about planting across the seasons – having something that blooms in the Spring for early pollinators, and into late Fall for the butterflies still making their way? Here are books and websites that will help you cultivate a pollinator pathway!

Books:

Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants

The Living Landscape: Designing for Beauty and Biodiversity in the Home Garden

Nature’s Best Hope: a New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard

Native Plants of the Midwest

The Midwest Plant Primer

Websites:

The Ohio Native Plant Month

The Native Plant Society of Northeast Ohio

Native Plants for the Small Yard

OSU Extension Fact Sheet

If you need more information, please do not hesitate to contact us and we’ll be glad to point you in the right direction! Go forth and plant natives!

~Dori

One Book, One City

Bicycling with Butterflies by Sara Dykman

Buddy Read – Week Two

Here we are at the start of the second full week of our One Book, One City program and hopefully we’re all taking another look at all the interesting creatures right outside our doors. If you haven’t started the book, don’t worry! We’ll be enjoying this book and all the accompanying programs all the way through Monday, August 2, when Sara Dykman will be answering your questions (virtually) at 6:00pm -register here to reserve your space!

If you want to read a book inspired by Bicycling with Butterflies, check out the digital collection or call the library 440.333.7610 x5501 for suggestions!

And don’t forget to check out what’s happening on the Children’s Department blog, RRPL Kid’s Depot, where you’ll find even more fun things to try out this Summer!!

Rocky River, are you ready to read together? Us too! Let’s get into it and turn that page

Week Two

Chapters 8-15

1. If you were planning the bike route, where do you think you could find the right data for deciding which roads to take and locations good for stopping?

2. Have you heard of native seeds or native planting before? What do you think about this movement, and would you be willing to try it out in your own backyard? Do you know what plants are native to this area?

3. If you’re interested in learning more about monarch butterflies being suggested for inclusion on the Endangered Species Act, check out this great page created by Phytophagy Lab at Cornell University.

4. Who else went searching for the different ways you can participate with Monarch Watch?

Programs happening soon:

Monarch Wonders Storytime 

Family event 

Tuesday, July 15 

To go along with this summer’s One City, One Book, join us virtually for songs, stories and a craft about the beautiful monarch butterfly. An activity kit will be available to pick up prior to the program. A link of the program will be sent the day of the event.

If You Plant It, They Will Come

Our 2021 One Book, One City reads are all about Monarch butterflies, tracing their travels, and learning about the importance of their journey. Monarchs are amazingly beautiful, but are just one of many pollinators that are threatened by decreasing habitat and climate change. If you remember one thing, remember that pollinators support our food crops – and finding ways to decrease habitat destruction or build new habitat will provide sustenance to future generations.

Native plants and their varying cultivars have evolved together with pollinators, and so have ideal flower sizes and shapes to support the many pollinators we need. And because they’re from Ohio, they’re easy to grow – no picky plants in the bunch! Here at Rocky River Public Library, with the help of the Beach Cliff Garden Club and library volunteers, we put in a pollinator garden that is officially certified by Monarch Watch. We’ve called our garden “Monarch Trails & Tales” and it includes milkweed for Monarchs, their only food, as well as numerous native perennials. Take a look at it the next time to visit and see what kinds of pollinators you spot – there’s butterflies and bees of course, but also small flies that are essential to pollination!

Lots of local nurseries sell native plants, and the Cuyahoga Soil & Water Conservation District sell native plants in groups of 50 for a reasonable cost. If we all sacrifice a little lawn or even plant containers of native plants, we can grow and nurture our pollinator population, creating pollinator pathways and beautiful gardens at the same time.

As Douglas Tallamy, professor in the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware and author of numerous books about the intersection of plants, animals and humans, writes “…we humans have disrupted natural habitats in so many ways and in so many places that the future of our nation’s biodiversity is dim unless we start to share the places in which we live –our cities and, to an even greater extent, our suburbs — with the plants and animals that evolved there”

~ Dori

Discover@RRPL

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Vacuum in Squares by Suzy Remer

Living in Lakewood, Ohio, life looked terrific for this family. They owned a beautiful home and mom was able to stay-at-home with her children. Unfortunately, dad worked from home. Dad was an unloving tyrant ruling his wife, twin daughters and stepchildren. He had rules that guided everything including: vacuuming, mowing, standing, sitting, eating, etc. As soon as possible, the stepchildren married and moved out tired of being treated worse than servants. Their father owned rental property in addition to the house in Lakewood, but he always pleaded poverty. He was good at manipulating the system in order to obtain anything free or at a much-reduced price. The author describes her mother as the sweetest person, but she did not cross her husband allowing his commands to continue.

After mom passed away, their dad remained just as mean and rotten. He never showed any love or thankfulness toward his family, (He did love his dogs.) The twins along with their older sister received the majority of the abuse later in his life. Even on his deathbed, he expressed no regrets.

The author realizes that her father was mentally ill who unfortunately did not seek out proper treatment. It’s amazing to hear this story and it is not an easy read.

~Emma

RRPL Summer Reads

My summer reading list is off to a great start!

Currently I’m reading The Five Wounds by Kirstin Valdez Quade. This is a debut novel about a New Mexican family.   The story begins with Angel, a 33-year-old man, living in Las Penas, New Mexico with his mother.  It is Holy Week and Angel has been given the part of Jesus in the Good Friday Procession.  At the same time, Angel’s 15-year-old daughter shows up pregnant on his doorstep, and so begins the family’s year long journey of love and sacrifice.

The Five Wounds: A Novel by [Kirstin Valdez Quade]

I also hope to read –

Malibu Rising by Taylor Jenkins Reid.

This novel is a Read With Jenna Book Club Pick as featured on The Today Show. Four famous siblings throw an epic party to celebrate the end of summer, but over the course of twenty four hours, their lives will change forever.

The The Sunset Route: Freight Trains, Forgiveness and Freedom on the Rails in the American West by Carrot Quinn.

The unforgettable story of one woman who leaves behind her hardscrabble childhood in Alaska to travel the country via freight train—a beautiful memoir about forgiveness, self-discovery, and the redemptive power of nature.

The Sunset Route: Freight Trains, Forgiveness, and Freedom on the Rails in the American West by [Carrot Quinn]

Mary

New Nonfiction for Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month

We are celebrating the Asian American and Pacific Islander Heritage Month in May, and we created a small selection of great books from 2020-2021 for you to choose from. 

Click on the pink text to go to our catalog to check out the book!

The Magical Language of Others : by E. J. Koh

Pop Song : by Larissa Pham

Why We Swim : by Bonnie Tsui

Family in Six Tones : by Harlan Margaret Van Cao & Lan Cao

Minor feelings : by Cathy Park Hong

This Is One Way to Dance: by Sejal Shah

Eat a peach : by David Chang

Crying in H Mart : by Michelle Zauner

Ace : by Angela Chen

Not quite not white : by Sharmila Sen

Semanur