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Winter Book BINGO: Spotlight on LGBTQIA January 17, 2019

Posted by gregoryhatch in Adventure, Book Discussion, Book List, Fantasy, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Horror, New Books, Romance, Science Fiction, Uncategorized, Winter Reading Bingo.
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The Merry Spinster

by Daniel Mallory Ortberg
Confessions of the Fox

by Jordy Rosenberg
RubyFruit Jungle

by Rita Mae Brown
Clariel

by Garth Nix
Less: a novel

by Andrew Sean Greer
So Lucky

by Nicola Griffith
Witchmark

by C.L. Polk

Lists of books with an LGBTQIA authors or character:

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Winter Reading Bingo: Attend a Program January 16, 2019

Posted by lgvora in Library Program, Uncategorized.
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I will let you in on a secret. One of the easiest squares to fill on our bingo board is this one:

square

A book may take days to finish (possibly weeks, if you read as slowly as I do), but attending a library program? You could knock out that square in an hour.

Here are the exciting events coming up in January and February. I hope you can make it out to at least one of them!

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Vision Poster Workshop
Saturday, January 19 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Registration required.

We will have scissors. And glue. And poster board. And a whooooole lot of magazines. Come think about your goals for the upcoming year, cut out images and words that speak to you, and turn the chaos of what 2019 could be into an inspirational collage.

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Knife Skills Screening
Thursday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m.

Come see the Oscar-nominated short documentary about the Shaker Square restaurant that all of Cleveland is talking about. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with a representative from Edwins Leadership & Restaurant.

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The Oscars Through the Years
Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m.

Learn the history of the awards and hear what a film scholar thinks about this year’s nominees for Best Picture.

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Tea with Rosa Parks
Monday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m.
Rocky River Memorial Hall (next to the Don Umerley Center)
Registration required.

Celebrate Black History Month by hearing stories from Rosa Parks and Viola Liuzzo about their work in the Civil Rights Movement. Tea and pastries will be served.

2-28 date night

Date Night
Thursday, February 28
Pottery tour begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Grand Reading Room.
Concert begins at 7:15 in the Auditorium.

Is there a more romantic combination than music, Cowan Pottery, and dessert (all for free)? We think not.

Lyndsey

Winter Reading BINGO: Spotlight on Books Set in Another Country January 15, 2019

Posted by Dori in Biographies, Book List, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, Non-Fiction, poetry, Winter Reading Bingo.
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book-mapDo you need a suggestion for reading a book set in another country or written by an author from another country? Well you are in luck – there are a wide range of books, both fiction and nonfiction, short and long. Here are just a few:

First I’ll list a few authors with a variety of titles:

Albanian writer Ismail Kadare
Chilean author Isabel Allende
Peruvian author Mario Vargas Llosa
Canadian author Margaret Atwood

And here are a few individual titles:

First They Killed My Father: a Daughter of Cambodia Remembers by Loung Ung
Ernest Hemingway’s Old Man and the Sea (Cuba)
The Poisonwood Bible by Barbara Kingsolver (Democratic Republic of the Congo)
The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo by Stieg Larsson (Sweden)
Cutting for Stone by Abraham Verghese (Ethiopia)
The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery (France)
The White Tiger by Aravind Adiga (India)
The Diary of Anne Frank (Netherlands)
The Orphan Master’s Son by Adam Johnson (North Korea)
Burial Rites by Hannah Kent (Iceland)
Born a Crime by Trevor Noah (South Africa)
The Invisible Bridge by Julie Orringer (Hungary)

and three classics:
Beowulf (Denmark)
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen (England)
The Death of Ivan Ilyich by Leo Tolstoy (Russia)

You could also read and Irish author; there’s The Dubliners by James Joyce or Tara Road by Maeve Binchy. How about a poetry book such as The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran (Lebanon) or Shanghai Girls by Lisa See? So many possibilities! If you don’t see something you’re interested in, feel free to stop by the Reference Desk for a suggestion – we’d be glad to help.

~ Dori

 

Winter Reading Bingo: Spotlight on Local Authors January 7, 2019

Posted by andrewfieldlibrarian in Uncategorized.
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So, as readers of Read it or Weep have come to learn, we are playing Winter Reading Bingo here at Rocky River Public Library.  Earn a bingo square by completing the (fun and edifying) task.  One of the bingo squares, which I”ll focus on in the blog post, is to read a local author.  But which local author, you say?

With so many wonderful Ohio authors to choose from, here are a few to get you started.

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Three novels by Toni Morrison (click on the book to take you to the catalog):

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Collected Poems by James Wright, newly acquired by RRPL:

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Two collections of novels by Dawn Powell (you could read just one novel in the book – each book has a few novels by her):

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Some links to Ohio authors:

http://ohiocenterforthebook.org/ohio-authors/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Category:Writers_from_Ohio

http://www.orrt.org/authors/

https://www.goodreads.com/shelf/show/ohio-authors

https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/31954.Ohio_Authors

 

Winter Book BINGO: Spotlight on Graphic Novels January 7, 2019

Posted by Megan in Graphic Novel.
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So you need to read a graphic novel in order to complete a BINGO, but you don’t know where to start. Let me help you. My own introduction to graphic novels was Bill Willingham’s Fables series. This epic series is a very grown-up retelling of classic fables and fairy tales. It’s still one of my favorite series. But you aren’t ready to jump into a 22-volume, Eisner Award winning series? No problem!

Try something cute, light, and funny:

Or maybe a graphic biography or memoir? We have books about familiar figures as well as ordinary people. Here are some of my favorites:

Ready to jump into a series? Let’s do it!

Maybe you’d like to try a classic:

Finally, let’s not forget the superheroes:

If none of these strike your fancy, come on in and browse our collection. Graphic novels are visual, you might just have to see them to find the one that’s right for you.

~Megan

BookTalk for Adults January 7, 2019

Posted by Mary in Book Discussion, Debut Author, Uncategorized, Young Adult.
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Friday, January 25th, 10:00 – 11:00, Community Room

This month we will be talking about Young Adult novels.  Young adult literature typically centers on teenagers.  The publishing industry markets these books primarily to young adults, however, that’s not always who reads them.  Did you know that approximately 55% of today’s young adult readers are adults?  At BookTalk this month we will be discussing YA fiction in fantasy and fiction genres.  We will also be talking about best selling YA author John Green, and current best seller novel, Children of Blood and Bone by Tome Adeyemi.  Come join us for coffee and good discussion.

Winter Reading Bingo is Here! January 3, 2019

Posted by Beth in Uncategorized.
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This winter we are so excited to help you meet your 2019 winter reading resolutions that we want to reward you for reading!   From now through February 28th you can participate in our Winter Reading Bingo program here at Rocky River Public Library.   For every bingo you complete, you can earn a raffle ticket to win gift cards, or  two tickets to any Playhouse Square production from March-May 2019.   We will be offering recommendations right here to help you complete squares on our Winter Reading Bingo board.

 

The first recommendation I’d like to make is to read a collection of short stories.  Here are a few of my favorite short story collections:

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Top Books of 2018 December 14, 2018

Posted by Dori in Book Awards, Book List, Book Review, Debut Author, Fiction, First Novel, Graphic Novel, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, New Books, Top Ten of 2019.
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I’ve had a bit of a slow reading year, but I still managed to find many treasures in the stacks. Some I read, others I listened to – through them I journeyed all over the world and went on a few adventures. Here’s a list of my favorites in no particular order:

greatThe Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai: The AIDS crisis in Chicago during the 80s, a difficult mother-daughter relationship, a job at a Northwestern art gallery – all of these elements spoke to me – I loved this book.


polishThe Polish Boxer
by Eduardo Halfon: After seeing his newest book, Mourning, on a few critic’s list, I decided to read this earlier one. Lyrical,  contemplative, autobiographical fiction about displacement and identity.

severanceSeverance by Ling Ma: A satire set in a dystopian world where a virus turns people into zombies who continue to perform routine actions – it’s told through the eyes of millennial worker bee Candace Chen, who is strangely nonplussed by this epic plague.

terribleA Terrible Country by Keith Gessen: Andrei is not doing too well in New York City so when his brother Dima enlists him to return to Russia to help care for his ailing grandmother, he jumps at the chance. A fascinating look at Russia and funny to boot!

americanahAmericanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: I can’t believe it took me so long to read this – what a great book about Nigeria, immigration, race, love and expectations.

pachinkoPachinko by Min Jin Lee: Hands down, the best book I read this year. It’s the story of four generations of a Korean family in Japan. Beautifully written, insightful, detailed, matter of fact but loving, just great.

greenhouseThe Greenhouse by Audur Ava Olafsdottir and The Atom Station by Haldor Laxness: I travelled to Iceland in September, so I read The Greenhouse Before I left. Though it wasn’t really set in Iceland, it was a lovely book about a young man’s coming of age. In Iceland, I visited the house of Nobel prize winning author Haldor Laxness (do visit if you go there – so cool) and bought The Atom Station atomthere. Laxness has an interesting style and I learned a lot about Iceland in the early 20th century, the government, the the social classes, and of course about drinking The Black Death (Brennevin – quite delicious)!

friendThe Friend by Sigrid Nunez: Winner of the National Book Award, this is a meditation on writing, suicide, grief, and the pleasure of dogs, amongst others.

belongingBelonging: a German Reckons with History and Home by Nora Krug: a wonderful autobiographical graphic novel about a German woman who digs into her past to discover more about her family’s role during the Nazi era and the silences afterwards. It’s packed with letters, photos and remembrances from her childhood.

BONUS BOOKS: November Road by Lou Berney and Sunburn by Laura Lippman are both really well-written crime/thrillers with great characters. There There by Tommy Orange is an eye-opening look at multiple Native Americans who converge at a powwow in Oakland. The Mars Room by Rachel Kushner takes you inside a woman’s prison and the circumstances that can bring you there. Oh and I forgot An American Marriage by Tayari Jones – such an amazing book about a marriage and an innocent man accused of a crime.

Wow – I came up with more than I originally thought – I guess it’s always a good year for  reading!

~ Dori

 

Beth’s Top 10 Reads of 2018 December 14, 2018

Posted by Beth in Top Ten, Women's Fiction, Young Adult.
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Thanks for taking a look at my top reads of 2018. I’ve included titles that moved me in some way.  Below you will find memoirs, fiction, children’s books, and pop-up books.  These books range considerably.  Some of the titles display magnificent examples of paper engineering, while others humanize very real social justice issues.   Thanks to my profession and personal responsibilities I have the opportunity to explore a wide array of books.  I hope you find something from this list that sparks you.

 

hate u giveeducatedeleanor oliphant

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Ann’s 2018 Favorites December 14, 2018

Posted by Ann in Book List, Debut Author, Fiction, Mystery, Top Ten.
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My reading gravitates to mysteries and suspense and this year to the British Isles, particularly Ireland.

The Ruin by Dervla McTiernan. Debut novel that draws you into the dark heart of Ireland.

Sweet Little Lies by Caz Frear. Debut procedural featuring Cat Kinsella as a young London policewoman whose investigation takes her to her own family secrets back in Ireland.

The Witch Elm by Tana French. The talented French is back with a non-series title about a happy-go-lucky young man whose fortune takes a terrible turn.

The Child by Fiona Barton. The skeleton of a baby found on a building site sends reporter Kate Waters scurrying over London to unravel the mystery of the child.

These novels are all set in the U.S. and while not strictly mysteries, each one has twists and turns and some mysterious goings-on.

Emma in the Night by Wendy Walker. Three years earlier the Tanner sisters disappeared. Now one is back, but where is Emma, the other sister?

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng. Mia Warren and her daughter Pearl become entangled in the lives of the Richardson Family. Set in Shaker Heights, Ohio.

Watch Me Disappear by Janelle Brown. Billy Flanagan disappeared on a hiking trip a year ago and is presumed dead. But now her daughter is having waking dreams that her mother is still alive.

A year is not complete without a couple of scifi/fantasy titles.

The Book of M by Peng Shepherd. In a dangerous future world, where people lose their shadows and their memories, a group of survivors search for answers. Those who loved Station Eleven and The Passage will love this as well.

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers. “From the ground we stand. From our ship, we live. By the stars, we hope.” This is the code of the Exodans, the decendants of those last humans who left Earth and reside in The Fleet, stationary ships in space. Third in the Wayfarer series.

And last, but not least, a picture book for cat lovers.

Niblet & Ralph by Zachariah O’Hara. Two look-alike cats mistakenly switch places in this in this sweet and delightful book for all ages.

 

                                                                                                                                                        ~Ann