Discover@RRPL

The Consequences of Fear: A Maisie Dobbs Novel

by
Jacqueline Winspear

It’s 1941 when 12-year-old Freddie Hackett, a government message runner in London, witnesses a murder. Freddie and the killer soon meet when he delivers a message directly to the killer. Freddie reports the crime to the police but no body is found and the case is dismissed. Determined Freddie contacts Maisie Dobbs who takes his eyewitness account seriously. The killer has some unusual facial characteristics that Freddie can identify. In addition to her detective work, Maisie works for the “Special Operations Executive” helping to recruit and interview workers for the French resistance. Maisie’s American boyfriend, Mark Scott, also works for his government and is in and out of the story. He adores Maisie and Anna, the little girl she adopted.

These are fun books for those who enjoy light British mysteries. I heartily recommend reading all of them in order to get the background story of Maisie. her friends, and family.

Maisie Dobbs
   1. Maisie Dobbs (2003)
   2. Birds of a Feather (2004)
   3. Pardonable Lies (2005)
   4. Messenger of Truth (2006)
   5. An Incomplete Revenge (2008)
   6. Among the Mad (2009)
   7. The Mapping of Love and Death (2010)
   8. A Lesson in Secrets (2011)
   9. Elegy for Eddie (2012)
   10. Leaving Everything Most Loved (2013)
   11. A Dangerous Place (2015)
   12. Journey to Munich (2016)
   13. In This Grave Hour (2017)
   14. To Die but Once (2018)
   15. The American Agent (2019)
   16. The Consequences of Fear (2021)

~Emma

Staff Poetry Favorites

April is National Poetry Month and in honor of this special celebration of poetry, I asked my colleagues to share some of their favorite poetry with me. For the next couple weeks I will highlight these selections on the blog. This week we hear from members of our Outreach staff on their favored works.

Image from The Poetry Foundation.

Fog

By Carl Sandburg

The fog comes

on little cat feet.

It sits looking

over harbor and city

on silent haunches

and then moves on.

“For me, poetry is a good way to connect with how I’m feeling or what I’m thinking about in a certain time and place. There are so many poems and poets, the style and content can be so different, it’s like there’s always a piece of candy that catches my eye. 

If Fog by Carl Sandburg were candy, it would be my perfect mix of caramel, chopped nuts, nougat, and chocolate. In just a few words, the poet creates an image and atmosphere, including a touch of whimsy with an accurate cat vibe. Thank you, Mr. Sandburg, for the gift of this poem!” Stacey, Outreach Coordinator

Image from The Poetry Foundation.

Life Doesn’t Frighten Me

by Maya Angelou

Shadows on the wall
Noises down the hall
Life doesn’t frighten me at all

Bad dogs barking loud
Big ghosts in a cloud
Life doesn’t frighten me at all

Mean old Mother Goose
Lions on the loose
They don’t frighten me at all

Dragons breathing flame
On my counterpane
That doesn’t frighten me at all.

I go boo
Make them shoo
I make fun
Way they run
I won’t cry
So they fly
I just smile
They go wild

Life doesn’t frighten me at all.

Tough guys fight
All alone at night
Life doesn’t frighten me at all.

Panthers in the park
Strangers in the dark
No, they don’t frighten me at all.

That new classroom where
Boys all pull my hair
(Kissy little girls
With their hair in curls)
They don’t frighten me at all.

Don’t show me frogs and snakes
And listen for my scream,
If I’m afraid at all
It’s only in my dreams.

I’ve got a magic charm
That I keep up my sleeve
I can walk the ocean floor
And never have to breathe.

Life doesn’t frighten me at all
Not at all
Not at all.

Life doesn’t frighten me at all.

” ‘Life Doesn’t Frighten Me’ by Maya Angelou is my pick this year. I’ve been chanting it to myself lately (for obvious reasons)!” Carol, Outreach Librarian

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

These are the books we are adding to our collection this week. Click on the orange text to go to our catalog and place a hold today!

Broken (in the best possible way)  by Jenny Lawson – The award-winning humorist and author of Let’s Pretend This Never Happened shares candid reflections on such topics as her experimental treatment for depression, her escape from three bears and her business ideas for Shark Tank.

Peaces by Helen Oyeyemi – Honeymooning aboard a historic former tea-smuggling train, newlyweds Otto and Xavier enjoy the locomotive’s fantastical accommodations before encountering a secretive fellow passenger, who imparts a surprising message. By the award-winning author of Gingerbread.

Gold Diggers by Sanjena Sathian – A satirical coming-of-age story follows the experiences of an Indian-American teen in the Bush-era Atlanta suburbs, who joins his crush’s plot to use an ancient alchemical potion to meet high parental expectations, triggering devastating consequences.

The Drowning Kind by Jennifer McMahon – Investigating an estranged sibling’s suspicious drowning at their grandmother’s estate, a social worker connects the tragedy to the unsolved case of a housewife who in 1929 allegedly succumbed to the consequences of a wish-granting spring.

The Nine Lives of Rose Napolitano by Donna Freitas – A woman who never wanted to be a mother reconnects with her estranged husband in the wake of unexpected news and is challenged to reevaluate herself in an unanticipated role. A first adult novel by the author of Consent.

Good Company by Cynthia Sweeney – A novel about the enduring bonds of marriage and friendship from the author of the New York Times best-seller The Nest.

Animal Instinct by David Rosenfelt – Investigating the murder of a woman he failed to protect years earlier, K Team private investigator Corey Douglas resolves to bring an abusive boyfriend to justice. By the best-selling author of the Andy Carpenter mysteries.

Miss Julia Happily Ever After by Anne Ross – A highly anticipated final installment in the best-selling series finds an outbreak of wedding fever in Abbotsville upended by a mysterious vandal who challenges a lively Miss Julia to save the day, and her friends’ nuptials.

First Person Singular: Stories by Haruki Murakami – Told in the first person by a classic Murakami narrator, a new collection by the Hans Christian Andersen Literature Award-winning writer explores the boundaries of the mind through subjects ranging from youth and music to baseball and solitude.

Mother May I by Joshilyn Jackson – Blackmailed by a mysterious kidnapper to commit a seemingly harmless act, a once-poor woman who married into wealth triggers a devastating chain of consequences. By the best-selling author of Never Have I Ever.

You Love Me by Caroline Kepnes – Retreating to a cozy island in the Pacific Northwest, Joe Goldberg takes a job at the local library where he becomes obsessed with librarian Mary Kay DiMarco and decides he is ready to make her do the right thing by making room for him in her life.

The Last Bookshop in London by Madeline Martin – Taking a job in a London bookshop just as the Blitz begins, Grace finds comfort in the power of words, storytelling and community as the bookshop becomes one of the only remaining properties to survive the bombings.

~Semanur

Discover@RRPL – Play Ball!

I just love April! It means Spring and Spring means Baseball! I’ve been a fan since I was tiny, listening to games with my Dad on the radio while he was working on yard projects or fixing whatever used car we had at the time. Something about the soothing sounds of the crowds, the crack of the bat, and cheering for the home team fill me with nostalgia and comfort and make me feel like everything is okay. What started as a family tradition for me continues on, but I doubt I am the only one looking forward to going to a game in person this year knowing that the stands at Progressive Field will be filled with actual fans instead of the cardboard cutouts that 2020 season saw. I’ll listen to today’s home opener on the radio, for old time’s sake, and then I’ll start reading the book I’ve had on hold that, coincidentally, just became available for me.

The Resisters by Jen Gish is a dystopian novel set in a not-too-distant future America about “haves” and “have-nots,” but it is also all about baseball and a girl named Gwen, a pitcher with a dynamite arm. This book sounds tailor-made for a book and baseball fan like me. I can’t wait! Find it in our catalog here. But first, let’s hope the good guys win! -Carol

Discover@RRPL

The Windsor Knot: A Novel

(Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, 1)

by S.J. Bennett

Set in 2016, Queen Elizabeth II is in residence at Windsor Castle where she hosts a “dine and sleep”. This is a coveted invitation where participants enjoy wonderful food, entertainment, and get to spend a night at the castle. A young Russian musician is found dead in his room. Staff want to shield the Queen from the news and horrific circumstances of the death, but she soon finds out. The Queen quietly participates in solving the murder with the help of her Nigerian assistant, Rozzi.

This is a winning premise for a new series with lots of name dropping. I particularly enjoyed Queen Elizabeth II and her assistant Rozzi and look forward to more installments. Fans of “The Crown” and “Downton Abbey” will enjoy the novel.

~Emma

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here we have some new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

The Beauty of Living Twice by Sharon Stone – The Nobel Peace Summit Award-winning actress, activist and humanitarian chronicles her efforts to recover and rebuild after a massive stroke, discussing how her health challenges were also shaped by industry standards, childhood traumas and family bonds.

Of Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia – The daughter of a Cuban immigrant battles addiction and the fallout of her decision to take in the child of an ICE detainee, while her mother wrestles with displacement trauma and complicated family ties.

Mrs. Wiggins by Mary Monroe – A tale set in the world of the award-winning Mama Ruby series follows the experiences of a woman from an at-risk family who marries a preacher to establish a safer life before discovering her husband’s desperate secret.

Sunflower Sisters by Martha Kelly – Union nurse Georgeanna Woolsey, an ancestor of Caroline Ferriday, travels with her sister to Gettysburg, where they cross paths with a slave-turned-army conscript and her cruel plantation mistress. By the best-selling author of Lilac Girls.

The Women of Chateau Lafayette by Stephanie Dray – A multi-generational saga based on true events is set in an extraordinary castle in the heart of France, where a schoolteacher, a socialite and a noblewoman question their roles and identities in the face of three major wars.

Tell No Lies by Allison Brennan – A woman LAPD detective and an FBI special agent team up to investigate the unsolved murder of a college activist whose demise may be linked to a high-stakes crime organization in the Southwest desert.

No Way Out by Fern Michaels – Struggling to remember the accident leading to her boyfriend’s disappearance, a coma patient and video game developer starts over in rural Mississippi, before an inexplicable reunion threatens everything she has rebuilt. By the best-selling author of the Sisterhood series.

The Red Book by James Patterson – Launching an investigation of his own when his instincts tell him that more is behind a political shooting on Chicago’s west side, SOS Detective Billy Harney uncovers a spate of murders connected to his troubled past.

The Path to Sunshine Cove by RaeAnn Thayne – The daughter of parents who died under traumatizing circumstances reevaluates her life on the road when she unexpectedly falls in love and reconnects with her sister, whose marriage has crumbled in the wake of a devastating diagnosis.

Libertie by Kaitlyn Greenidge – Coming of age as a free-born Black woman in Reconstruction-era Brooklyn, Libertie Sampson struggles against her mother’s medical aspirations for her when she finds herself more drawn to a musical career that could compromise her autonomy.

Elizabeth & Margaret: The Intimate World of the Windsor Sisters by Andrew Morton – This biography of Queen Elizabeth II and her sister Margaret examines their early idyllic youth as the closest of sisters as well as their often fraught relationship after their father’s death and Elizabeth’s ascension to the throne.

World on the Wing, A: The Global Odyssey of Migratory Birds by Scott Weidensaul – Offers exhilarating exploration of the science and wonder of global bird migration.

~Semanur

Discover Book Club Kits@ RRPL

I’m a bit corny. I like to celebrate each month by reading a book that correlates with any holidays or heritage celebrations happening during that month. This mindset can also help you with the daunting task of picking a book for your next Book Club meeting. It’s not too late to read a book about Ireland for March. We have two book titles in our Book Club Kit collection that brings the reader to Ireland, in all its beauty and travails. Keep in mind, a kit includes 8 copies of the same title and a set of discussion questions , available in a library canvas bag, to be checked out to the library card of the person picking up the kit. Stop by the adult reference desk and give it try. Two Book Club Kits to consider for March are:

A 38 year old widow and mother of 10 was dragged from her Belfast home in 1972. Keefe uses this abduction and murder as a prism to tell the history of The Troubles in Northern Ireland.
A sweeping novel about the hope, sacrifice and love between two Irish sisters and the secret that drives them apart.

Éirinn go Brách