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Winter Book BINGO: Spotlight on Audiobooks January 22, 2019

Posted by gregoryhatch in Adventure, Audio, Beach Reads, Biographies, Book List, eAudio, Fantasy, Gentle Read, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, Non-Fiction, Romance, Science Fiction, Suspense, Thrillers, Uncategorized.
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Some of my Favorites

Title details for The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath - Wait list
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Title details for The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle - Available
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Title details for The Power by Naomi Alderman - Wait list

LISTS TO GET YOU

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First comes a Debate, Second comes a book! September 26, 2016

Posted by Gina in Audio, Biographies, eAudio, New Books, Non-Fiction, Uncategorized.
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Like many Americans, you may be planning to watch the first Presidential Debate tonight at 9pm between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. After all the dust has cleared, come check out the Biography section here in the library to read about the past presidents. Browse the New Nonfiction displays, I think I see a new book about Clinton and Trump every week! There are many titles on Audiobooks and the OverDrive and Hoopla applications in case you would rather listen than read.

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I’d rather Listen! September 9, 2016

Posted by Gina in Audio, eAudio, Music, Thoughtful Ramblings, Uncategorized.
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Are you going on a trip in the car this weekend? What about walking at the park or going hiking? Have you ever thought about taking a book, not to read but to listen to? I have a 5 hour drive to see my parents when I go home for the holidays, so I always stock up on audiobooks. I also try and go on walks at the parks and around my neighborhood. I also use the Hoopla and OverDrive applications on my phone to listen to books. In addition, Hoopla has a variety of music albums that can be listened to.

Come check out the New Audiobook display, or the ones in the general collection here in the library. We have a Playaway collection too.

Need help getting familiar to the Hoopla and OverDrive applications? A staff member at the reference desk can assist you or use the Digital Library page to find instructions for your device.

Have fun reading, or rather listening!

-Gina

 

Lastest Additions November 16, 2015

Posted by Megan in Book List, Book Review.
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Oh, what a difference a year makes! Last year at this time we where digging out of a late fall blizzard and bracing ourselves for more snow and record cold. It was weather that demanded we hunker down and read. A year later it’s nothing but clear skies and temperatures in the 60’s. It’s perfect weather for an outdoor project or a walk on the beach. I managed to squeeze both of those into my day yesterday; an audiobook and my dog my constant companions. My amazing and handy brother built me a bench from our grandmother’s old bed frame. Look at all that sun! Note the T-shirt! Later, Kevin (the dog) and I explored a new stretch of beach down at Edgewater and discovered this unusual structure. All the while, I was riveted by Career of Evil, by Robert Galbraith. This third book in the Cormoran Strike series is definitely my favorite. One of my awesome colleagues already entered this title into the Reading Room.

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Whether you are looking to hunker down and read or trying to soak up every last bit of warmth and sunshine, the Reading Room will help you find the perfect book. Check out some of these Latest Additions or explore the extensive back list of titles.

career of evil

Career of Evil by Robert Galbraith.

furiously

Furiously Happy: A Funny Book About Horrible Things by Jenny Lawson.

ana

Ana of California by Andi Teran.

this is your life

This is Your Life, Harriet Chance! by Jonathan Evison.

And finally, here is a sneak peek at a book coming in 2016:

salt to the sea

Salt to the Sea by Ruta Sepetys, February 2, 2016 (put yourself on hold now!)

Happy Reading!

~Megan

Your Book Your Brew November 5, 2015

Posted by Dori in Audio, Biographies, Book Discussion, Book List, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Literary Fiction, New Books, Non-Fiction.
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Both the brews and the books were flowing when the Your Book Your Brew group met Friday, October 23 at Tommy’s Summer Place. We each shared 2 to 3 books that we’d enjoyed and then the discussion took off!

Here’s the list:

Ann:

dayeight

The Day We Met by Rowan Coleman and Eight Hundred Grapes by Laura Dave

Ed:

gowives

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee and The Wives of Los Alamos by Tarashea Nesbit

Sarah:

torchiceprincess

Torch by Cheryl Strayed and The Camilla Lackberg series

Stacey:

crookedsouldumplin

Crooked Heart by Lissa Evans, Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery and Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy

Dori:

fateskitchens

Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff and Kitchens of the Great Midwest by J. Ryan Stradal

Mike:

puritycloudlumenlordfearclassa

Purity by Jonathan Franzen, Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, Luminaries by Eleanor Cotton and Lord Fear and Class A, both by Lucas Mann

Donna:

nemesisbeachalertliar

Nemesis by Catherine Coulter, Beach Town by MaryKay Andrews, Liar by Nora Roberts and Alert by James Patterson

Other books that came up in the conversation were two books by food guru Ruth Reichl, her new memoir My Kitchen Year and her foray into fiction, Delicious. We reminisced about the children’s book All-of-a-Kind Family by Sydney Taylor and discussed a few biographies, including those about Johnny Carson and Charles Manson and a memoir by actress Jennie Garth (yes, that’s how it goes when you’re talking books – all over the map!). We also talked about The Women’s Room, a feminist novel published in the late 70s, The Library at Mount Char, a weird but really good new science fiction book that Stacey and I listened to and heard raves about Tampa, by Alisa Nutting.

Thanks to Ann, Ed, Sarah, Sarah, Donna and Mike for joining us and we hope more folks will come along and share some book recommendations at our next meeting on Friday, December 11th at 5pm at Erie Island Coffee Co.

Dori

Listen Up! July 16, 2014

Posted by stacey in Audio, Book Discussion, Book List, Genre Book Discussion.
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This was such an easy category to define! Audiobooks are any book of any genre, it’s only limited by the format -you need to listen with your ears not read with your eyes. Love it! The only catch? I think it takes time to be a good audiobook listener, but once you’ve got the knack you’ll find all sorts of chores aren’t as horrible anymore. Let’s listen in (haha!) to what everyone had to say about their selection this time around, shall we?

Carol: Joseph Finder’s edge-of-your-seat thriller Suspicion takes place in contemporary Boston. Writer and single dad Danny Goodman finds that he can no longer afford his daughter’s fancy private school and is given a generous loan by her best friend’s dad, millionaire Thomas Galvin. Galvin might work for a drug cartel though, and the DEA wants Danny to snitch–putting Danny’s and his daughter’s lives in jeopardy. This was a great book to listen to, but next time I pick up a book by Finder, I’ll be sure to get a paper copy to allow me to read it at the lightning fast pace his books deserve!

Julie: Published eight years ago, Michael Pollan’s Omnivore’s Dilemma is just as important for every American to read (or listen to!) today. We are plagued with too much, often conflicting, information on the age old question of what to eat for dinner. Something seemingly simple has become incredibly complicated, but Pollan helps us understand it better. I read the book many years ago and have found that listening to it is even easier and the narrator, Scott Brick, very good at bringing what is already compelling nonfiction, to life.

Steve: Happy, Happy, Happy: My Life and Legacy as the Duck Commander, by Phil Robertson, is the autobiography of the patriarch of the popular Duck Dynasty clan. Phil tells of his life story, warts and all, and you might be surprised to learn that he was not a real nice guy, walking out on his family for a life or partying before finding God. The stories about starting the duck call business are pretty funny and are the true strength of the book. There is some preaching and Bible quoting, but it’s not until the later chapters that it becomes more prominent. Narrator Al Robertson, the eldest son of the family, lends an authentic voice to this audio version.

Jamie: Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson is set in Newcago (the city formerly known as Chicago) after an unknown event has altered the humans of Earth. Now they come in two categories: normal and epic. Epics have special powers they use for their own gain and rule any weaker opponent with no mercy, until David decides to enact revenge for his father’s death. Everyone thinks that Steelheart is unbreakable, that he has no weakness. But, David has seen him bleed. He sets out to join the Reckoners, a group of ordinary people that study the weaknesses of Epics and destroy them. The reader of this audiobook is MacLeod Andrews, who really brings the action to life.

Megan: The Storied Life of A.J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin and narrated by Scott Brick is like a love letter to little bookstores and people who love them. It is at once both a heartwarming and heartbreaking story about the power of words. After the death of his wife, bookstore owner A.J. Fikry seems determined to wallow in grief and drink himself to death. However, a bizarre and seemingly unrelated series of events provide A.J. with an opportunity to rebuild his life. Scott Brick, an acclaimed voice artist, is the award-winning narrator of over 600 audiobooks. Fans of audiobooks will no doubt recognize his familiar voice, while those new to listening will be charmed by his work.

Emma: In Can’t Wait to get to Heaven by Fannie Flagg, Elner Shimfissle falls off a ladder while picking figs upsetting a hornets’ nest. She dies later at the hospital, enters heaven temporarily, and meets up with a variety of people including her sister, Ginger Rogers, and Thomas Edison. But heaven isn’t ready for Elner just yet. An uplifting and entertaining story.

Lauren: The Devil in the White City by Erik Larson relies heavily on Larson’s research of primary source material and recounts the people and events surrounding the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago. Larson writes in a signature “narrative nonfiction” style, telling the story of true events in a way that reads like fiction. We learn about Chicago before the turn of the century and the Chicago World’s Fair through two men: Daniel H. Burnham, the lead architect of the Fair, and Dr. H.H. Holmes, the man known as “America’s first serial killer,” who lured victims into the labyrinthine Chicago hotel where he did his killing. This book keeps up a swift pace by moving back and forth the creation of the Fair and the sinister actions of Dr. Holmes. Larson takes us on a journey from the construction of the White City through the opening of the Fair and it’s reception around the world, as well as from the moment Holmes claims his first victim to the moment the law finally catches up to the killer. The audiobook is read by Scott Brick. Brick has an impressive resume and brings a smooth and sophisticated tone to the narration that really keeps the listener entranced.

Chris: Bossypants written and read by the great Tina Fey was a real joy. I read the book when it first came out, and even though Tina’s voice was in my head, her comedic timing wasn’t. Oh, what a difference; the audio was so much better. Hearing her recount her dating experiences, working dilemmas—at Second City, SNL and 30 Rock—and just her quirky observations shouldn’t be missed.

Stacey: Homeland by Cory Doctorow is the sequel to Little Brother and I would suggest reading them in order for maximum enjoyment, but it’s not deal breaker. The content of these stories is reminiscent of George Orwell’s 1984, with the Government playing fast and loose with the civil rights of citizens but the more recent publishing dates appropriately reflect the changes in technology, the global political climate, and still manage to include entertaining pop culture references! A bonus feature to the audio edition? Wil Wheaton is the reader!! So. Much. Fun! -and thought-provoking too.

Next time? We’re going from one pretty open-ended genre -audiobooks- with plenty of options to another pretty open-ended genre -award winners! The easy-peasy definition of this genre: the book you chose won some sort of official, recognized award! Enjoy!

— Stacey

I Love to Listen-Awesome Audio October 26, 2011

Posted by Megan in Audio, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Non-Fiction, Thrillers, Women's Fiction, Young Adult.
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I know I have talked about this before, but it bears repeating: audiobooks are awesome. I mean really, what else are you doing during your morning commute? I suggest switching off the “downer” news, pop in a book on cd and see how much better you feel when you find yourself stuck in a traffic jam. Switching to books in the car has done wonders for my blood pressure since I am no longer in a furious rush to get anywhere. Why would I rush when I have someone telling me a story? Same deal with walking the dog. As soon as I pull out the Playaway my dog is jumping around and drooling with excitement because she knows that I could walk forever once I get into my “book.”  Between my 20 minute daily commute to and from work, driving around town running errands, and walking the dog on a semi-regular basis, I have managed to “read” 36 books for far this year just by listening. Not too shabby. So, you are ready to give listening a try? Where to start? Here are some of my favorites:

One of my favorite series to listen to is Alan Bradley’s Flavia De Luce mysteries. Narrator Jayne Entwistle does a marvelous job of giving the precocious youth sleuth and amateur chemist a voice. Meet Flavia in The Sweetness at the Bottom of the Pie. Her adventures continue in The Weed That Strings the Hangman’s Bag and A Red Herring Without Mustard. I am anxiously awaiting the next book, I am Half-Sick of Shadows. These charming and hilarious mysteries are a real crowd-pleaser.

 

 

 

 Looking for something more suspenseful and fast-paced? Richard Doestch’s The 13th Hour is just that! This book has it all-edge of your seat action, murder, mystery, and time travel.

 

 

 

 

 

 Is nonfiction your thing? I loved the audio version of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. This is the thought-provoking story of how one woman, without her knowledge or permission changed the world of medicine.

 

 

 

 

 How about historical fiction? The Book Thief by Markus Zusak is currently shelved in the Teen collection, but I know plenty of adult book clubs that selected this one to discuss. It is a heartbreaking and moving look at WWII, told from the point of view of Death. On many occasions I found myself sitting in the driveway after work listening instead of going inside.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I also really loved Water for Elephants, everything Sarah Addison Allen writes (Garden Spells, Sugar Queen, The Girl Who Chased the Moon, and The Peach Keeper), Blood Oath, and Going Bovine.

Did you find something to listen to? I hope so!

˜Megan