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Here’s what we’re reading now… June 30, 2017

Posted by SaraC in Uncategorized.
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I Found You: A Novel by Lisa Jewell

I Found You by Lisa Jewell

Sara- Single mom, Alice Lake finds a man sitting on the cold, rainy beach outside her house.  He has no name, no jacket and no memory;  she lets him in.  Who is he, and is anyone looking for him?  An interesting read with likable characters that kept me guessing.

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

Emma- This is the story of Paul Kalanithi, who at 36 years old, had nearly completed his residency in neurosurgery when he was diagnosed with Stage IV lung cancer. As physician and patient he faced his death head on with the loving support of his wife and family. An inspirational moving memoir.

The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz

The Spellman Files by Lisa Lutz

Beth-  We are introduced to Isabel Spellman, private investigator. Following in her parent’s footsteps, Izzy can’t help but run background checks on every potential suitor she meets, usually causing some trust issues early in her relationships.  This funny, engaging story unfolds the wacky world of the Spellman family, leaving the reader craving more.

 

 

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The Hours Count: A Novel June 24, 2017

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hours

Ethel and Julius Rosenberg were executed in June 1953 as “atom spies”. They were the only Americans executed for espionage during the Cold War. In the novel fictional characters Ed and Millie Stein were neighbors of the Rosenberg’s. Ethel, Julius, and Ed were members of the Communist party. This compelling novel combines facts about the Rosenberg’s with fictional neighbors and friends.

~Emma

Happy Father’s Day! June 17, 2017

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The idea of Father’s Day was publicly supported by President Calvin Coolidge in 1924, but was not presidentially proclaimed until 1966. It was assured of annual recognition by

PL 92-278 in April 1972.

Capture

happy

 

(It’s interesting to note that in 1914 President Woodrow Wilson signed a measure officially establishing the second Sunday in May as Mother’s Day. Father’s Day became a celebration 58 years later.)

 

~Emma

June is Audiobook Appreciation Month June 14, 2017

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You are welcome to enjoy the wide variety of audio options available through Rocky River Public Library including books on cd and digital content available through Overdrive and Hoopla.

Check us out at http://www.rrpl.org.

 

get-caught-listening-banner-2011

~Emma

Orwell’s 1984 published June 8, 2017

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Orwell’s 1984 was published on June 8, 1949 in England by Secker & Warburg. The novel was set in the superstate of Oceania and Big Brother was introduced.

1984

First American Edition Cover

published by Harcourt Brace in 1949

 

From the original review in the New York Times:

Nineteen Eighty-Four is a work of pure horror, and its horror is

crushingly immediate.”

 

~Emma

Author/Illustrator Richard Scarry June 1, 2017

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Author and illustrator of more than 250 children’s books, Richard Scarry was born on June 5, 1919.  I remember reading his books and watching his videos when our son was a little boy. Join Huckle Cat and Lowly Worm as they visit the library in Busytown.

(refrain) At the library, the library, you can find any book from A to Z.

At the library, the library, there are books for you and me.

I AGREE – Emma

Fun on Memorial Day Weekend May 25, 2017

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Memorial Day is a U.S. federal holiday currently observed every year on the last Monday of May. It originated as Decoration Day after the American Civil War and it was established as a time for the nation to decorate the graves of the Union war dead with flowers. Eventually the holiday was extended to honor all Americans who died while in the military service.

It also marks the start of the unofficial summer vacation season and results in a 3 day weekend for many lucky Americans!

What kind of fun will you be up to this holiday? If you aren’t sure yet and are looking for things to do, here’s a list of area activities happening this Memorial Day Weekend:

balloons

FESTIVALS:

Berea’s National Rib Cook-Off: May 26 to 29 at the Cuyahoga County Fairgrounds

Blossom Time: May 25 to May 28, in and around downtown Chagrin Falls

Day Out with Thomas (Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad): Friday-Sunday May 26-28, Departs from Boston Mills – Brandywine Ski Resort 7100 Riverview Road, Peninsula

Flats East Bank Taste of Summer: Old River Road,Flats East Bank, Friday, May 26, 4 p.m. – 10 p.m., Saturday, May 27, noon – 10 p.m., Sunday, May 28, noon – 10 p.m.

Tremont Greek Festival: May 26 to 29, corner of West 14th and Fairfield in Tremont neighborhood of Cleveland

PARADES AND CEREMONIES:

Avon Lake: Monday, May 29, 10 a.m. – noon, Veteran’s Memorial Park.

Bay Village: Memorial Day Parade, May 30 at 8:450 a.m. from Huntington Park.

Brecksville: Monday, May 29, 10:30 a.m. parade begins at City Hall.

Cleveland, Riverside Cemetery:  Monday, May 29, 9:30 a.m.

Cleveland Heights: Monday, May 29, 10:30 am at the Veterans Memorial in Cumberland Park

Fairview Park: ceremony, 8 a.m., Fairview Park City Hall, parade 9:00 a.m. from Corrigan Craciun Funeral Home, West 208 Street and Lorain Road

Hudson: American Legion Family Memorial Day Parade will step off at 10:00 am from Milford Rd.

Independence: parade, 9 a.m.

Medina: Friday, May 20, 7:30 p.m., Candlelight Vigil, town square

Lake View Cemetery:  Monday, May 29, 10:30 a.m. at the Garfield Memorial

North Ridgeville:  Monday, May 29, parade begins at 9:45 AM from the Marc’s parking lot and will end at the Middle School Ranger Stadium with a ceremony to follow at the stadium

Westlake: Monday, May 29, 10 a.m. from Sts. Peter & George Coptic Orthodox Church to Clague Park.

Whatever you end up doing, I hope you enjoy it!

                                                                       ~Carol

Libraries Are Awareness Creators May 18, 2017

Posted by lgvora in Library Program, Thoughtful Ramblings.
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In observation of mental health awareness month, Rocky River Public Library will welcome author Sakeenah Francis to tell her story of living with paranoid schizophrenia. Ms. Francis will speak on Thursday, May 18 at 7:00 PM.

sakeenah

The event comes at an opportune time, with mental health appearing often in the headlines. What ramifications, if any, will the change in laws have for those in need of mental health care? Suicide rates are on the rise, while access to mental health care is becoming more limited. The media is buzzing about the controversial Netflix series 13 Reasons Why and its glamorized portrayal of suicide.

Our library, like many across the United States, aims to provide informational, educational, recreational, and cultural resources to patrons in the community. To me, community education starts with creating pockets of awareness. Sometimes this means giving patrons an opportunity to learn a skill, like cooking or jewelry making. Sometimes this means preparing patrons to transition well into the next stage of life, such as retirement or college.

Other times, this can mean giving a voice to people at the margins of society, in hopes of humanizing cancer patients or lifting stigmas around mental health. When we give Sakeenah a space to share her story, we are providing patrons an opportunity to become aware of her struggles and empathize with the situation she has found herself in. Same goes for Joanna Connors, a Cleveland writer and survivor of rape and PTSD, who spoke to us in February about her memoir, I Will Find You.

Some have challenged the idea that education can help eliminate stigma. In last week’s Crain’s New York article, How to Eliminate the Stigma Around Mental Illness, researcher and psychology professor Patrick Corrigan said, “Education is grossly overrated for changing the stigma of mental illness, especially for adults. Stigma doesn’t really change much when you go out and tell people what to think.”

While Corrigan didn’t define what, in his opinion, education is or is not, he said that meeting a person with a mental illness is a more effective route to normalizing mental illness and reducing stigma. He encouraged those affected by anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia to “come out everywhere.”

Corrigan seems to separate “formal” education and casual interactions, but I would argue that by providing authors a venue to tell their stories—placing books on our shelves or arranging a visit with an author—we are facilitating a hybrid of formal and casual that makes for deeply personal dialogue.

GRAPH

Library programs provide just enough structure to form a pocket where awareness can be created and empathy can be extended. I am proud of the library’s role in our community, and my role within the library, where planning programs that encourage community members to listen to one another is all in a day’s work.

Lyndsey

It’s National Pack Rat Day! May 17, 2017

Posted by carol in Uncategorized.
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Observed on May 17, National Pack Rat Day encourages us to take a look at ourselves and see if we have “Pack Rat” tendencies. While most of us enjoy collecting something, when our collections turn to clutter and we run out of space to put everything, a change is necessary for our peace of mind.

clutter

This unofficial holiday is the perfect opportunity to begin to clean your space and beautify your surroundings!

One way to recycle your unwanted (and overflowing) items is to hold a yard sale. An added bonus is that you might make a few dollars for more useful things.

You can also donate your unwanted belongings. This is a win-win scenario—you’ll get satisfaction from helping others and reduce your clutter in the process. There are many charitable organizations that will pick up your donations right from your front door.

If you are truly motivated, you can get a table at a local Flea Market and unload your collectibles or head to a website like ebay or craigslist and sell online!

This household purging is the ultimate spring cleaning–find your inner zen, make a little cash and do some good, all while keeping items out of the landfills!

                                                                                                                                  ~Carol

The Handmaid’s Tale & Other Reasons to Love Margaret Atwood May 13, 2017

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I’ve been a huge fan of Margaret Atwood since I read The Handmaid’s Tale in the early 90s. Published in 1985, this dystopian novel won the 1985 Governor General’s Award and the very first Arthur C. Clarke Award in 1987! It was also nominated for the 1986 Nebula Award, the 1986 Booker Prize and the 1987 Prometheus Award. Despite the accolades, and having been adapted into a 1990 film and a 2000 opera, many readers are just finding Atwood’s masterpiece thanks to a new TV series created by Hulu and starring the amazing Elisabeth Moss.

Regardless of how or when you’ve found Margaret Atwood, I say “hooray.” Now you must run, not walk, to your local library and check out all of her books. I highly recommend starting with my other two favorites: The Blind Assassin and Alias Grace. The Blind Assassin, published in 2000, is an amazing blend of historical and science fictions, and contains a novel within a novel. It won the Man Booker prize and Time magazine named it the best novel of 2000 and included it in its list of the 100 greatest English-language novels since 1923.  Alias Grace is a work of historical fiction about the notorious 1843 murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper, of which two other Kinnear household servants, Grace Marks and James McDermott, were convicted of the crime.

Atwood’s novels feature strong female characters facing adversity. Her books are politically charged and she’s an advocate for the environment and animals. While she is best known for her work as a novelist, Atwood has also published fifteen books of poetry. Oh, and she’s an inventor too! She is the creator and developer of the LongPen, a remote signing device that allows a person to remotely write in ink anywhere in the world via tablet and the internet. Impressed yet? Here’s one more tidbit: her latest novel, Hag-Seed, is a modern retelling of William Shakespeare’s The Tempest. It’s smart and funny  and inventive–just like Margaret Atwood.

                                                                                                       ~Carol