Do The Time Warp Again

A Rip Through Time
by Kelley Armstrong

It’s May 20, 2019 and Vancouver homicide detective Mallory Atkinson is in Edinburgh, Scotland visiting her dying grandmother. To let off some steam, Mallory goes for a run and comes across what appears to be a woman in period costume being strangled. Mallory attempts to intervene and is strangled and left unconscious.

When Mallory wakes up, she’s not herself, both figuratively and literally. Instead, she finds herself in the body of a young housemaid, Catriona Mitchell, who was also attacked and left for dead in the exact spot Mallory was, on the very same day – 150 years earlier, in 1869!

Mallory cannot reason why she’s become a stranger in a strange body in a strange time, but quickly realizes that if she wants to survive (and not end up in an insane asylum), she’ll have to keep her origin story to herself and learn what it takes to be a housemaid in Victorian Scotland. Lucky for Mallory, her “new’ employer, Dr. Duncan Gray, is the local undertaker who assists Edinburgh Police Detective McCreadie solve crimes. When Mallory learns that the two men are investigating the strangulation of a man, an attack like the one made on Mallory’s life, she pins her hopes that helping to catch the murderer will lead her back to modern times.

Playing the role of Catriona along the way, however, who is more street-savvy thief than young, timid maid, might be tougher than Mallory suspects. And if Mallory is in 1869 making a mess out of Catriona’s life, what ever could Catriona be up to in Mallory’s life in 2019?

If you like mysteries, time travel stories, engaging characters, and historical fiction, you won’t want to miss A Rip Through Time by Kelley Armstrong. My only complaint about this first in a new series is that I will have to wait for the sequel. It almost makes me wish that time travel were truly possible.  

-Carol

Cozy up with a new book

The Wedding Dress Sewing Circle by Jennifer Ryan

There are three narrators to the story. Fashion designer Cressida Westcott faces the loss of her business and home destroyed in the London Blitz. She moves back home to Aldhurst with nothing but the clothes on her back. Violet Westcott, Cressida’s niece, is a living a carefree life dreaming of marrying a titled man until her conscription letter arrives. Grace Carlisle plans to marry the local vicar and quietly support his career. She wants to wear a white dress on her wedding day. With the help of the village sewing circle and Cressida, Grace’s mother’s wedding dress is transformed into a beautiful gown once again.

Grace does not marry the local vicar after all but offers the use of her wedding dress to others. With clothing and fabric rationed, it’s the only way many women can wear a white dress on their wedding day. The sewing circle receives donations of used wedding gowns. They repair and update them for new brides.

There is so much more to the story. Cressida wants to get back to work in London. Grace ends up working for Cressida as a creative assistant and model. Violet marries an American serviceman and is moving to the States. All three women find love in unexpected places.

This is a charming tale not to be missed.

~Emma

Listen With Pride

June is both Pride Month and Audiobook Month. Let’s get you listening to some fabulous stories starring LGBTQ characters!

A few of my favorite Fiction Titles-an exciting space opera, a whirlwind romance, a heartwarming fantasy, and a charming tale of family and grief.

Check out these nonfiction titles, a mixed bag of humor and heartbreak.

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here we have some new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

It All Comes Down to This by Therese Anne Fowler – Three sisters—Beck, a freelance journalist; Claire, a pediatric cardiologist; and Sophie, an Instagram influencer—come together to sell the family’s summer cottage in Maine, which becomes complicated by an enigmatic ex-con with his own hidden past. By a New York Times best-selling author.

Nightcrawling by Leila Mottley – When a drunken altercation with a stranger turns into a job she desperately needs, Kiara, who supports her brother and an abandoned 9-year-old boy, starts nightcrawling until her name surfaces in an investigation exposing her as a key witness in a massive scandal within the Oakland Police Department.

Iona Iverson’s Rules for Commuting by Clare Pooley – An advice columnist breaks her rule for never talking to other commuters on the train when she witnesses a nurse save another man choking on a grape.

Cult Classic by Sloane Crosley – From a New York Times best-selling author and Thurber Prize finalist comes a twisted mystery on the metaphysics of modern love, memory and mind control.

James Patterson by James Patterson: The Stories of My Life by James Patterson – A #1 best-selling author shows how a boy from small-town New York made it to literary stardom.

These Impossible Things by Salma El-Wardany – Each navigating love, sex and the one night that changes it all, three Muslim best friends, Malak, Kees and Jenna, as their lives begin to take different paths, must find a way back to each other as they reconcile faith, family and tradition.

Aurora by David Koepp – When a solar storm knocks out the power across the globe, Aubrey Wheeler, in Aurora, Illinois, becomes the fierce protector of her suburban neighborhood, while across the country, her brother, a Silicon Valley CEO, hunkers own in his gilded desert bunker, leading to a long-overdue reckoning between siblings.

Counterfeit by Kristin Chen – Follows the story of two Asian American women who band together to grow a counterfeit handbag scheme into a global enterprise.

Ordinary Monsters by J.M. Miro – Introduces readers to the dark, labyrinthine world of The Talents.

Tracy Flick Can’t Win by Tom Perrotta – Tracy Flick, the iconic protagonist of Election, is back in full force as the hardworking assistant principal at a public high school in suburban New Jersey where she, energized by the prospect of a long-overdue promotion, sets out to prove her worth and get what she deserves.

~Semanur

Get Cozy, with a Mystery

Jane Darrowfield, Professional Busybody by Barbara Ross

Jane Darrowfield is in her 60s and after just a year of retirement from her job as a corporate executive, she’s already bored. She’s put her extra time to good use, however, and has managed to help a few friends out of some delicate situations, and word has got around in her hometown of Cambridge, Massachusetts. When the director of a nearby senior living community asks Jane to help solve a problem among its residents – and get paid to do it – Jane agrees, even though it means she’ll be temporarily relocating to a place she feels she’s not old enough to live in.

Jane goes undercover as a prospective resident and quickly figures out who the bullies behind the pranks and rivalries are at Walden Springs. Before she is there a full 24 hours, one of the residents is found dead on the golf course and Jane finds herself in the middle of murder investigation. Have these seniors’ juvenile shenanigans gotten out of hand or is there something more sinister afoot? Don’t worry, Jane will get to the bottom of things.

Jane Darrowfield, Professsional Busybody is the first in a series and Jane is the perfect sleuth – smart, level-headed, and a good observer who is unafraid to stick her nose into other people’s business. With plenty of humor, the promise of possible new romance, and plenty of red herrings that will keep you guessing, why not take a break from the heavy stuff and pick up this cozy mystery? And then, reward yourself with its sequel, Jane Darrowfield, and the Madwoman Next Door.

-Carol

“Once Upon a Crime” June 6th – 7:00-8:00

You are invited to attend a discussion of the following novel

in the Community Room on June 6th.

Hope to see you there!

The Last Mona Lisa by Jonathan Santlofer

On August 21, 1911, Leonardo da Vinci’s masterpiece the Mona Lisa was stolen from the Louvre by museum worker Vincent Peruggia. The theft was not discovered immediately. In truth, many thought the painting was taken to the roof where others were being photographed due to better lighting. After two days, an international hunt was on to recover the stolen work. Peruggia’s scheme was to have forgeries made of the painting and have them sold as the original. Along with the forger and go-between, Perrugia would become rich. (There were nine forgeries.) In 1913, Perrugia returned the Mona Lisa to the Louvre. Was it the real thing or a forgery?

Vincent Peruggia is the great-grandfather of art professor Luke Perrone. Luke is obsessed with the story behind the theft. He travels to Florence, Italy. His great-grandfather’s journal is available at the Laurentian library in Florence. Others seem interested in the truth behind the theft including an INTERPOL agent and a young American woman.

A terrifying and thrilling multi-layered novel.

~Emma

Happy Pride Month!

June is Pride Month, celebrating the LGBTQIA+ community! Throughout June, we’ll explore different books and themes, all about Pride. To start things off, let’s read some graphic novels! 

Its fourth volume recently published in 2021, Heartstopper (by Alice Oseman) is a graphic novel series depicting a budding romance between Nick and Charlie at their UK high school. Nick, Charlie, and their friends are navigating high school, while dealing with homophobic peers and family, and the pressure of trying to be in control. Heartstopper offers a heartwarming look into some teenagers’ experiences being gay, lesbian, and transgender in the modern world. 

And before you ask, yes, the series was picked up by Netflix and the entirety of the first season is available to stream now!  

The Times I Knew I Was Gay by Eleanor Crewes is a memoir in graphic novel form. Crewes examines her coming out journey and how she came to terms with her sexuality. She reminds us that coming out is a process, needing to come out over and over again to family, friends, and even to oneself. Funny, relatable, and a little meandering, Crewes tells a story that many will identify with and hopefully find solace in.  

Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic by Alison Bechdel is another memoir graphic novel exploring the author’s sexual identity. Bechdel chose to write Fun Home to try to better understand her relationship with her father, a closeted gay man, and to analyze their life trajectories. Fun Home has won numerous awards, including the Stonewall Book Award for non-fiction and the GLAAD Media Award for Outstanding Comic Book.  

These are just a few of the many graphic novels with an LGBTQIA+ focus. Book Riot has a great list to check out if you’re curious for more!

-Linnea

Read With Pride

Today marks the beginning if Pride Month, a celebration created to honor the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. While great strides have been made in securing equal rights for members of the LGBTQIA+ community, the work is clearly not done as evidenced by a number of new anti-gay laws as well as book and program challenges in school and libraries. In fact, in 2021 half of the 10 most challenged and banned books were books with LGBTQIA+ content.

Why is this so concerning? Because representation matters. For LGBTQ youth, it can be a matter of life and death. Seeing positive, realistic portrayals of queer characters is life-affirming. But books written by and/or about LGBTQIA+ characters aren’t just for for queer kids. These books can help cisgender, heterosexual readers understand the experiences of their gay friends and family members. Reading about the lives and experiences of people who are different from us helps build empathy and understanding.

So, go forth and read with Pride! Not sure where to start? Check out this list: https://www.epicreads.com/blog/lgbtq-ya-books-pride/

Cozy up with a new book

In the middle of the Spanish flu epidemic in 1918, sisters Helen and Lutie (Lucretia) sell their family home in Iowa and move to Denver. They buy a home with a basement apartment. Maud, Ronald, and 10-year-old Dorothy Streeter are their tenants. Maud dies from the flu; Ronald disappears; and Dorothy is left alone. Helen and Lutie want to adopt Dorothy.

Helen is a nurse, and her boyfriend Gil is a doctor. Lutie works as a fashion illustrator for a downtown department store which caters to wealthy customers. Lutie is engaged to Peter Howell, a seminary student, who enlists. When Peter is killed his parents are very supportive of Lutie, Helen, and little Dorothy.

When Ronald Streeter reappears to retrieve Dorothy, he is stabbed to death and Helen is left holding the bloody ice pick. Helen confesses that she killed him. Gil helps Helen dispose of the body. They leave the body on the side of the road assuming a “death wagon” patrolling the streets will pick it up.

There is so much more to the story. It is an emotional novel full of love, loss, and family support.

~Emma

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

This week we have varieties of exciting new books picked out for you to indulge into. Enjoy!

The Shore by Katie Runde – When their father, the owner of a beachside real estate company, develops a brain tumor, needing constant care, siblings Liz and Evy still seek out summer adventures while their mother tries to keep it together, wishing to leave the beach behind her.

Two Nights in Lisbon by Chris Pavone – Waking up in Lisbon alone, her husband gone with no warning, no note, not answering his phone, Ariel Price, sensing something is wrong, realizes she knows so little about her new, much younger husband, and discovers just how far she’ll go when everything is on the line.

Nightwork by Nora Roberts – Harry Booth, a clever thief who can’t afford to get attached, finds his heart stolen by Miranda Emerson, but must leave her cruelly behind to free himself from the grip of a deadly predator in order to possess something more valuable than anything he has ever stolen—Miranda.

Sound of Darkness by Heather Graham – Gifted with ability to “hear” people, rookie FBI agent Colleen Law teams up with Krewe of Hunters K9 officer Mark Frampton to bring an elusive monster who kidnaps and murders young women to justice and soon becomes the killer’s obsession.

You Made a Fool of Death With Your Beauty by Akwaeke Emezi – Learning how to feel joy while healing from loss, Feyi Adekola starts dating the perfect guy, but discovers she has feelings for someone else who is off limits and must decide just how far she is willing to go for a second chance at love.

Clive Cussler’s Dark Vector by Graham Brown – The head of the U.S. National Underwater and Marine Agency’s (NUMA) Special Assignments Team unravels a new mystery in the dangers above and below the sea in the latest addition to the long-running series following Fast Ice.

Omega Rules by Eric Van Lustbader – When a fellow Parachute agent is assassinated in Vienna, Evan Ryder is sent on a dangerous world-wide hunt for the truth, pitting her against forces so powerful they may go beyond her abilities to annihilate.

Every Cloak Rolled in Blood by James Lee Burke – A novelist honoring his late daughter’s memory by saving two young men ravaged by the opioid crisis is drawn into a network of crime until the ghost of his daughter helps him fight back.

With a Mind to Kill by Anthony Horowitz – Traveling behind the Iron Curtain, James Bond must convince the Russians, including a beautiful Soviet psychiatric analyst, that he is a double agent to infiltrate a group planning a major act of terrorism, which, if successful, will destabilize relations between the East and West.

~Semanur