Discover@rrpl.org

Ghost Ups Her Game

by Carolyn Hart

Bailey Ruth Raeburn, a resident of heaven and a member of the Department of Good Intentions, is given an assignment in her hometown of Adelaide, Oklahoma. When she arrives at Goddard College, the site of the murder, young lawyer Robert Blair and assistant professor Iris Gallagher are standing over the dead body of college fundraiser Matt Lambert. Iris is holding the murder weapon but denies being the murderer. Robert disposes of the incriminating evidence. Working with the knowledge of the local police chief, Bailey Ruth appearing as a police officer, a private detective and a fashionable 27-year-old redhead identifies suspects responsible for the murder.

The 9th entry in the Baily Ruth mystery series is a quick fun read. You might want to give all of them a try.

Bailey Ruth Ghost
   1. Ghost At Work (2008)
   2. Merry, Merry Ghost (2009)
   3. Ghost in Trouble (2010)
   4. Ghost Gone Wild (2013)
   5. Ghost Wanted (2014)
   6. Ghost to the Rescue (2015)
   7. Ghost Times Two (2016)
   8. Ghost on the Case (2017)
   9. Ghost Ups Her Game (2020)
   10. Ghost Blows a Kiss (2021)

~ Emma

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here some of the new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

Cover image for Aftershocks : a memoir

Aftershocks by Nadia Owusu – An award-winning essayist combines literary memoir and cultural history to examine her personal struggles with her mixed-heritage identity and the emotional trauma of her mother’s abandonment and father’s dark secrets.

Cover image for The captive : a novel

The Captive by Fiona King Foster – A woman with elite skills from her violent past travels with her family and an escaped criminal through a harsh winter landscape to claim a bounty and safeguard her loved ones from murderous rivals.

Cover image for Detransition, Baby

Baby Detransition by Torrey Peters – A trans woman, her detransitioned ex and his cisgender lover build an unconventional family together in the wake of heartbreak and an unplanned pregnancy, in a debut by the author of the novella, Infect Your Friends and Loved Ones.

Cover image for The children's blizzard : a novel

The Children’s Blizzard by Melanie Benjamin – The best-selling author of The Aviator’s Wife draws on oral histories of the Great Plains blizzard of 1888 to depict the experiences of two teachers, a servant and a reporter who risk everything to protect the children of immigrant homesteaders.

Cover image for The Lost Boys: A Decker/Lazarus Novel

The Lost Boys by Faye Kellerman – Detectives Peter Decker and Tyler McAdams link two suspicious disappearances from an assisted living facility to the case of three missing campers, before the reappearance of a foster son’s biological mother upends Decker’s home life.

Cover image for Sleep well, my lady

Sleep Well, My Lady by Kwei Quartey – PI Emma Djan investigates the death of a Ghanaian fashion icon and social media celebrity, Lady Araba, who was found murdered days after breaking up with her boyfriend, a womanizing talk-show host.

Cover image for Saving justice : truth, transparency, and trust

Saving Justice: Truth, Transparency, and Trust by James Comey – The former FBI Director and best-selling author of A Higher Loyalty, uses his long career in federal law enforcement to explore issues of justice and fairness in the U.S. justice system.

Cover image for The Forever Girl

The Forever Girl by Jill Shalvis – Returning to her hometown to attend an estranged friend’s wedding, Maze navigates unexpected secrets with her childhood circle of friends while discovering that she still has feelings for a long-ago crush.

Cover image for The scorpion's tail : a Nora Kelly novel

The Scorpion’s Tail by Douglas Preston & Lincoln Child – A sequel to Old Bones finds FBI agent Corrie Swanson and Santa Fe archaeologist Nora Kelly investigating the mummified corpse of a long-dead victim who died in agony while holding a mysterious 16th-century gold cross.

Cover image for Spin

Spin by Patricia Daniels Cornwell – Captain Calli Chase races against time to thwart a plot that leaves the fate of humanity hanging in the balance.

~Semanur

Reading Resolutions Reset

I usually make New Year’s Resolutions and, like many, don’t keep them. One regular resolution of mine that I usually keep, however, is reaching my set goal of reading 52 books annually. While this might sound like a lot of reading, I know many people who put my numbers to shame, and that’s okay. Everyone’s reading pace is different. And, is it cheating to turn up the speed of audiobooks? (I say no!)

So, while I’ve been keeping this resolution over the last few years, I’ve kept a little blank book with lists of the books and the year that I’ve read them. I’ve been very proud of my little notebook and was sure I could keep up this pace…until 2020 happened. Oddly enough, in a year where I should have had more time to read than ever due to lack of socializing, I failed, and stalled somewhere around book #47! Even worse, it’s January 11th and all I can do is stare at screens (and no, they are not the screens where I have loaded e-books). I haven’t downloaded an audiobook, cracked a book cover, or even (gasp!), written the year down on the fresh page in my aforementioned precious notebook that mocks me from across the room.

How can I face that notebook knowing my intentions have changed? Yes, I will read. Yes, I likely will even read 52 books this year. And yes, I’ll likely record these books somewhere. But first, I’m going to be kind to myself about this. And, when I’m ready to turn a page, I’m sure I’ll find myself immersed in my next favorite novel.

Until I have a book to recommend, be kind to yourselves and one another. And, if you are feeling like I have been feeling, know that when you are ready for distraction, information, entertainment and connection, the library will be here waiting for you. ~Carol

Discover a New Book Club @RRPL

Some amazing news for 2021 – Roxane Gay is starting The Audacious Book Club and inviting all interested parties to join! Roxane is an award winning fiction and non-fiction author, Twitter goddess and New York Times op-ed contributor. Her books include Bad Feminist, Hunger, Difficult Women, An Untamed State and Black Panther graphic novels. Roxane is brainy, funny, and pointedly insightful.

She’s already announced the list of books but there’s not a lot of details. I’ll keep you posted when I find out more so we can read and explore the titles together with Roxane on future Mondays. First, though, get a copy of January’s title, Black Futures.

JanuaryBlack Futures, edited by Jenna Wortham and Kimberly Drew (Week of 1/25)
FebruaryDetransition, Baby by Torrey Peters (Week of 2/22)
MarchThe Removed by Brandon Hobson (Week of 3/22)
AprilMilk Blood Heat by Dantiel W. Moniz (Week of 4/26)
MayLibertie by Kaitlyn Greenridge (Week of 5/24)
JuneOf Women and Salt by Gabriela Garcia (Week of 6/21)
JulyThe Five Wounds by Kirstin Valdez Quade (Week of 7/26)
AugustSomebody’s Daughterby Ashley C. Ford (Week of 8/23)
SeptemberThe Renunciations by Donika Kelly (Week of 9/20)
OctoberThe Heart Principle by Helen Hoang (Week of 10/25)
NovemberSometimes I Trip on How Happy We Could Be by Nichole Perkins (Week of 11/22)
DecemberAfterparties by Anthony Veasna So (Week of 12/13)

~ Dori

Books on Democracy and Government

It sure seems like 2020 is back from the dead to plague us in the new year, doesn’t it? If you, like me, would like a refresher on democracy and how our government works, I’ve chosen some books that will educate and inform.

Click any of the book covers below to be taken to our catalog, where you can request a copy of the book with your library card number and PIN. We’ve also included links to our e-media services Overdrive and Hoopla where available. 

The Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton

Plato’s Republic

Democracy in One Book Or Less:
How It Works, Why It Doesn’t, and Why Fixing It Is Easier Than You Think 
by David Litt

You Call This Democracy? How to Fix Our Government
and Deliver Power to the People
by Elizabeth Rusch

Twilight of Democracy: the Seductive Lure of Authoritarianism
by Anne Applebaum

A User’s Guide to Democracy: How America Works
by Hannah McCarthy and Nick Capodice

A User's Guide to Democracy catalog link

Surviving Autocracy by Masha Gessen

Discover@rrpl

Happy New Year!

I read the following novels over the last few weeks and am sharing a mixture of historical fiction, mystery, adventure, and just plain fun. Consider giving them a try.

The Brilliant Life of Eudora Honeysett by Annie Lyons

Lonely 85-year-old Eudora contacts an assisted suicide clinic in Switzerland. She is ready to die on her own terms with dignity. Happily new neighbors move in next door and 10-year-old Rose declares Eudora her new best friend. Soon Rose latches on to elderly neighbor Stanley declaring him to be another new friend of hers. The threesome spend time together and go on a few adventures that give Eudora and widower Stanley a new lease on life as well as some new friends.

The Mystery of Mrs. Christie by Marie Benedict

This is a novel loosely based on historical fact. When Agatha Christie’s husband wants a divorce, Agatha disappears for several days with no clues. Authorities suspect her husband had something to do with the disappearance. Agatha would not leave her young daughter behind willingly.

Redhead by the Side of the Road by Anne Tyler

Geeky tech expert and building superintendent Micah Mortimer is happy with his life and teacher girlfriend Cassia (Cass) Slade. Until… One day Brink Adams, a college freshman, shows up at his door claiming to be Micah’s son. Micah did have a relationship with the young man’s mother in college, but declares that he is not Brink’s father. Brink stays with Micah for a time. In the meantime, Cass is losing her apartment and Micah does not suggest that she move in with him. Why can Brink stay, but Cass is not invited to move in?

The Artic Fury by Greer Macallister

Based on historical fact, it’s 1853 when Virginia Reeve is hired by Lady Franklin to lead a group of women explorers to the Arctic. Their assignment is to to figure out definitely what happened to Captain Sir John Franklin’s expedition. The conditions endured by the women are dreadful. Unfortunately not everyone returns from the expedition and Virginia is placed on trial for the murder of one of the participants.

~Emma

Discover Your 2021 Reading Goals

Like many other librarians and avid readers, I have set a reading goal for myself each January for at least the past decade. The book number tends to steadily increase, though I’ve stuck to 50 books for the last couple years. 50 books seemed daunting when I first set that goal, but after realizing I should count everything I read (not just novels) it was definitely an attainable goal. Between the single issue comics I regularly pick up and the plethora of cookbooks I seem to always have checked out, I’m able to get to my goal without too much trouble. This year I’m planning to revisit some old favorites for second or third readings (looking at your American Gods) in addition to a good variety of newly published titled and new to me titles.

If you are someone who hasn’t set a reading goal before, or perhaps you’ve struggled with not completing your goal, I’m here to encourage you to give it another try! Most importantly to remind you- if you are setting this reading goal for fun, because you enjoy reading, then make sure you have FUN! I have plenty of friends who seem to beat themselves up for not reading more, but your reading habits aren’t for any awards or competition. Read what you like, as often as you like. If that means 5 books a year, then that is fabulous!

I often hear people putting pressure on themselves to read “important” books. Just the other day my husband semi-jokingly said “2021 will be the year I read Crime and Punishment!” as he grabbed the Dostoevsky classic off our home bookshelf. Is he actually going to read this book? Probably not. Is it a book that he might feel he is supposed to read because #literature? Yes. But who really cares about all that? If all you want to read in 2021 is romantic comedies, cozy mysteries, or heartwarming dog stories, then you do you.

This year, as I ease back into my routine after some relaxing time sequestering myself away during the holidays, I’m looking at what I am most excited to read in the coming months. Below you will find some of the soon-to-be published titles I cannot wait to read in 2021!

The Removed by Brandon Hobson

A House at the Bottom of a Lake by Josh Malerman

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro

Peaces by Helen Oyeyemi

Getaway by Zoje Stage (no cover art available)

The Final Girl Support Group by Grady Hendrix

Star Eater by Kerstin Hall

Poison Flowers and Pandemonium by Richard Sala

If you are a horror fan like me I highly recommend checking out this awesome post from Emily Hughes on the Tor Nightfire blog- you can see all the horror books being published in 2021 in a handy dandy month by month list! *heart-eyes emoji*

2020 was obviously a difficult year, and even though there is a light at the end of the tunnel for 2021, we aren’t out of the woods yet so be kind to yourself and read what brings you joy and happiness. What are you most excited to read this year? Share in the comments below!

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here are some of the new books coming to our shelves this week for you to add to your book list!

Better Luck Next Time by Julia Claiborne Johnson – A follow-up to the best-selling Be Frank with Me follows the experiences of a former Yale student whose life at a 1930s Reno divorce ranch is upended by a shy woman and a thrice-divorced pilot.

Martha Stewart’s Very Good Things: Simple Tips and Genius Ideas for an Easier and More Beautiful Life
by Martha Stewart – The premier American lifestyle expert and television personality shares practical tips and clever solutions for making life easier and more delicious such as infusing vinegar with herb blossoms and using lip balm to free a stuck zipper.

The Prophets by Robert Jr. Jones – Two enslaved young men on a Deep South plantation find refuge in each other while transforming a quiet shed into a haven for their fellow slaves, before an enslaved preacher declares their bond sinful.

All the Colors of Night by Jayne Anne Krentz – A sequel to The Vanishing finds a young man with rare crystal-energy abilities partnering with a disgraced paranormal artifacts finder to track down a mysterious relic that may be tied to a parent’s sudden coma.

Neighbors by Danielle Steel – Opening her home to neighbors in the aftermath of a devastating earthquake, a reclusive woman inadvertently triggers events that reveal secrets, divide relationships and forge new bonds among strangers. By the best-selling author of All That Glitters.

American Traitor by Brad Taylor – Assisting a witness’s flight from murderous foreign agents, Pike Logan and Jennifer Cahill uncover a plot to trigger a war between China and Taiwan by destabilizing the latter’s government and digital defenses.

The Push by Ashley Audrain – A devoted mother with a painful past gradually realizes that something is very wrong with her daughter, a fear that is complicated by her husband’s dismissive views and the birth of a healthy son.

Twenty by James Grippando – A nightmarish shooting at their daughter’s school finds Jack Swyteck and his law-enforcement officer wife, Andie, investigating a chief suspect’s alleged ties to Al Qaeda amid growing anti-Muslim fervor.

The Wife Upstairs by Rachel Hawkins – Supplementing her modest income by stealing small valuables from her gated-community clients, a broke dog-walker endeavors to win the heart of a wealthy bachelor before learning his late wife’s own rags-to-riches story.

Black Buck by Mateo Askaripour – An unambitious college graduate accepts a job at Sumwun, the hottest NYC startup, and reimagines himself as “Buck” a ruthless salesman and begins to hatch a plan to help young people of color infiltrate America’s sales force.

Bone Canyon by Lee Goldberg – A sequel to Lost Hills finds Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department homicide detective Eve Ronin investigating the cold-case disappearance and death of a woman whose remains are found in the aftermath of a Santa Monica Mountains fire.

~Semanur~