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Eeek…the HORROR! October 9, 2017

Posted by Dori in Book List, Fiction, Horror.
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All you horror fans, you know this month is for you. But those of us who aren’t regular readers of the genre can find things to relish as well. Who doesn’t like to feel a little thrill of fear once in a while?

Here’s a list of hair-raising books to explore; some are classic, some new, but all are sure to get you in the mood for this creepiest of seasons (click on covers to explore further):

littleclassicsilence

araratsomethingshining

wongittales

hornshearthaunting

frankbarker

draculabrokenharvester

Check out the Horror Writers Association for more eerie titles.

Happy Haunting!

~ Dori

 

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What We’re Reading Now… September 12, 2017

Posted by SaraC in Biographies, Book Discussion, Book List, Book Review, Fantasy, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Non-Fiction, poetry, Science Fiction, Thrillers.
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Here’s a look at some of the books the Adult Services department is reading now:

A Rage in Harlem by Chester Himes

 

A Rage in Harlem by Chester Himes

Hapless Jackson begins his foray into crime by investing every penny he has in a sure-fire scheme to turn legitimate ten-dollar bills into counterfeit one-hundred dollar bills. It is only after Jackson loses all his money, and some of his bosses, that he turns to his streetwise brother Goldie for help. Goldie, who dresses as a Sister of Mercy and collects alms for ‘charity,’ works the seedier side of Harlem in aid of not only Jackson but Goldie’s own pocketbook. Written and set in 1950s Harlem this is a grippy and taut classic crime caper.  Trent

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John Ashbery: Collected Poems

I’ve been re-reading John Ashbery’s Collected Poems, 1956-1987, published by the Library of America.  Ashbery passed away last week, and there have been some wonderful tributes written about him online.  His poems are so wonderful, mysterious, and enigmatic – they feel like adventures of the mind, where you don’t know where you’ll end up, but the process can be exhilarating.  For readers who enjoy experimentation with language, Ashbery is one of the greatest.  Andrew

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 Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz

Magpie Murders by Anthony Horowitz is a mystery within a mystery. Susan Ryeland is the editor of popular, but difficult, author Alan Conway’s books. When he suddenly dies of a suspicious suicide after turning in his most recent manuscript, Susan begins some detective work of her own, beginning with investigating the contents of the manuscript. Will it reveal Conway’s killer? Dori

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In the Great Green Room by Amy Gary

In the Great Green Room is a fascinating window into the life of Margaret Wise Brown, the children’s author who famously penned Goodnight Moon, The Runaway Bunny, and over 100 others. The book begins in Margaret’s childhood: a whirlwind of boarding schools in Switzerland and Massachusetts, shoulder-rubbing with members of elite United States families, and family vacations in island homes off the coast of New York–all the while, Margaret’s mind was constantly turning out whimsy. Later in her adult life, she had a playfulness that drew a stream of friends, associates, editors, and lovers to her house. She spent her first royalty check on a cartful of flowers; she lead a group called the Bird Brain Society where any member could declare a day Christmas and the other members would come over and celebrate it; the line between play and life was never entirely clear to her. Just when, at 42, she was engaged to be married and began settling into a more stable life, she died suddenly. This biography is a wonderful read for those interested in bold, brilliant women who made a mark on the world in unconventional ways. Lyndsey

Cover image for Girls made of snow and glass

 

Girls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust

Girls Made of Snow and Glass  is a new YA retelling of Snow White. Mina, the daughter of a magician, has a heart of glass. When she and her father move to Whitespring Castle Mina devises a plan to win the king’s favor so that she can be the queen and finally know love. When she finally succeeds at her plan, she becomes a stepmother to the princess Lynet. Lynet is the spitting image of her dead mother, who by all accounts was beautiful and delicate. Lynet is headstrong and fierce and hates living the the shadow of a mother she never knew. When King Nicholas declares his intention make Lynet the Queen of the South instead of Mina, he creates a rivalry between the two women. Is Mina capable of destroying the one person who loves her? Can Lynet save the only mother she has even known? Megan

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American Gods by Neil Gaiman

I recently revisited this personal favorite of mine after watching the TV adaptation produced this past summer. Gaiman is a master story teller that produces accessible, yet still challenging, novels. To enter the world of American Gods is to enter a place where every deity ever worshiped on American soil is given a corporeal presence. Recently released from prison Shadow Moon is greeted with devastating news that sets him on a fantastical journey which reveals the gods living among us. These deities who live on attention and worship are far from their heyday and are showing the signs of the neglect. It doesn’t help that their worshipers have shifted their attention to new gods created through our culture’s adoration of technology, media, and the world economy. A book that seamless combines the world and troubles of the everyday with the fantastical. I would recommend this to readers who are new to Gaiman and get a full picture of his style and world building. Greg

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The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis

The Undoing Project by Michael Lewis is about the research that two men did 40 years ago about the way we make decisions. This is a very biographical, anecdotal depiction of Daniel Kahneman and Amos Tversky. If you go into this book wanting to know about the men who created the field of behavioral economics, you’ll enjoy this one. Beth

 

 

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Nutshell by Ian McEwan

A tale told by a baby-to-be or not-to-be? This story unfolds by a talking fetus who bears witness to an affair between his mother, Trudy, and his uncle, Claude. The adulterous pair are scheming to kill the baby’s father, John. Will the narrator be able to prevent such a crime, and possibly pursue revenge?Many twists and turns as to what will become of our villains, victims and beloved narrator.  McEwan has stuffed this tale with Shakespearean throwbacks and extensive dialogue filled with weighty vocabulary – have your dictionary handy! Mary

Cover image for MY SISTER'S GRAVE:

 

My Sister’s Grave by Robert Dugoni

This is the first book in the Tracy Crosswhite series, a story of a woman who has spent the last 20 years questioning the circumstances around the death of her sister, Sarah and the murder trial that followed. When  Sarah’s body is finally found, her sister Tracy, now a homicide detective is determined to find out what happened all those years ago, and why people she loved and trusted lied to her.  An exciting, well-written thriller with twists and turns that surprise, but don’t push the bounds of belief.  I’m a little late to the Crosswhite series with the author soon to publish Book #5, but I’m looking forward to getting to know Tracy better as I keep reading! Sara

 

Cover image for On her majesty's frightfully secret service

 

On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service by Rhys Bowen

Lady Georgiana (Georgie) Rannoch wants to marry her Catholic fiancée Darcy but first needs permission from Queen Mary and parliament. By marrying Darcy she would give up her place in line as 35th in line to the British throne. The Queen asks a favor of Georgie first. There is a party that the Prince of Wales and Mrs. Simpson will be attending. The queen wants Georgie to go to the party and make sure the Prince and Mrs. Simpson don’t marry. Two guests are murdered at the house party and Georgie gets involved in solving the mysteries almost becoming a victim herself. Emma

New in the Reading Room! September 8, 2017

Posted by SaraC in Beach Reads, Book Discussion, Book List, Book Review, Fiction, Historical Fiction, Mystery, Uncategorized.
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Take a look at these new book reviews in our Reading Room.  Click on the link to take you there.

 

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Stars Over Clear Lake by Loretta Ellsworth

 

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Agatha Christie: Closed Casket by Sophie Hannah

 

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 On Her Majesty’s Frightfully Secret Service by Rhys Bowen

 

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Mrs. Queen Takes the Train by William Kuhn

 

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The Man Who Never Stopped Sleeping by Aharon Appelfeld

 

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The Coroner’s Daughter by Andrew Hughes

 

Latest Editions! July 5, 2017

Posted by SaraC in Book Discussion, Book List, Book Review, Summer Reading.
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Here are the newest additions to The Reading Room. Use the links to see reviews and  book descriptions.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

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In Farleigh Field: A Novel by Rhys Bowen

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Into the Water by Paula Hawkins

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New Boy: A Novel by Tracy Chevalier

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News of the World by Paulette Jiles

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Rebel Queen: A Novel

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The Fifth Letter by Nicola Moriarty

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The Finishing School: A Novel by Joanna Goodman

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The Fire by Night by Teresa Messineo

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The Hollywood Daughter by Kate Alcott

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When Breath Becomes Air by Paul Kalanithi

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What We’re Reading Now… March 1, 2017

Posted by SaraC in Book Discussion, Book List, Book Review.
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Here are a few books we are enjoying now, and we hope you will enjoy them too!

Don’t Think of an Elephant! 10th Anniversary Edition: Know Your Values and Frame the Debate by George Lakoff is more than just a how-to guide for progressives. Lakoff, one of the founders of the field of cognitive science uses cognitive science and linguistics, to explain how conservatives and progressives frame their values and stances on issues. This is a fascinating look at how our brains work and offers valuable insight on how to effectively communicate with people whose beliefs are different from yours. Megan

Neil Gaiman’s The Ocean at the End of the Lane is a fantasy story about a man drawn to return to the place he grew up to remember a wild and mysterious turn of events when he was just seven years old.  Equal parts magical and terrifying, the memory centers on his neighbor, the intriguing Lettie Hempstock.  Speaking of magical, I listened to this on audiobook and it’s read by Neil Gaiman himself and that voice–I could listen to him forever! Lauren

If you are a Seinfeld fan, please do yourself a favor and read the book Seinfeldia: How a Show About Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Keishin Armstrong.  This is a FANTASTIC trip down memory lane, and gives backgrounds  on the origin of characters and storylines.  I was surprised to learn that each year all the writers  were let go in hopes that they would consistently get fresh ideas by bringing new ones in (although one writer who had been with the show from the beginning avoided this fate).  Don’t feel too badly for them, Seinfeld writers were in great demand and could use the show as a springboard.  Casual fans will likely find the book tedious, but for those of us who scheduled our Thursday nights around the show, this is a treasure. Steve

The Kind Worth Killing by Peter Swanson takes us through the intertwined lives of two college peers, who hide their crazy well.  The story unfolds with past and present narration to help the audience keep up in this fast paced suspense novel. The intricate plot will keep the reader guessing beyond the last page. Beth

I sped through Australian author Graeme Simsion’s The Rosie Project because it was a hilarious read. The story is introduced by the main character and narrator Don Tillman, a genetics professor in search of love. To find the woman he should spend the rest of his life with, Don creates a questionnaire. The list of questions tries to eliminate someone by asking whether or not they are a smoker, a drinker, their meal preferences, punctual, etc. Don is thrown off guard when he is introduced to Rosie Jarman, a woman who is everything that Don would not find suitable for a life partner. Rosie seeks Don out for assistance in finding her biological father. Through their interactions, Rosie opens Don’s life into a whole new world and a strong friendship forms. This was an exciting, funny, and dramatic story. I listened to the audiobook, which I encourage, read by Australian actor Don O’Grady. Gina

An unforgettable and moving read, Among the Living by Jonathan Rabb is a novel set in post-Second World War Savannah, Georgia where Yitzhak Goldah, a Holocaust survivor, is welcomed into the home of his American relatives, Pearl and Abe Jesler. There, among the city’s thriving Jewish community, Yitzhak becomes “Ike,” and he must find a way to “return to the living” while adapting to a different kind of racism of the American South. When he falls for a local widow, Ike unexpectedly discovers tensions between the traditional and Reform Jews in Savannah. And when a woman from Ike’s past appears, he must choose between a promise once made and the hope for happiness. Carol

In The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti, Samuel Hawley has settled down with his 12-year-old daughter Loo in a small New England fishing village where her mother grew up. Told in alternating chapters, we learn about Samuel’s criminal past and how he’s received 12 bullet wounds, and about Loo, what she learns about her mother and father, and how she grows up amidst her parents’ pasts.  Dori

The Secret Place, the 5th book in the Dublin Murder Squad series by Tana French was a fascinating story of the lives of two cliques of teenage girls at an Irish boarding school. A boy was murdered on the grounds of the girls’ school one year ago, and the murder was never solved. But now a card with the words, “I KNOW WHO KILLED HIM” has appeared on the anonymous “Secret Place” bulletin board where girls share their thoughts, fears and secrets. And it is up to Dublin Murder Squad detective Stephen Moran to sort out who knows what, and whodunit. Sara

Age is Just a Number -of Good (Teen) Books! February 7, 2017

Posted by stacey in Book Discussion, Book List, Genre Book Discussion, Young Adult.
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I have some sad news -It was decided to stop our monthly staff genre book discussions and I have to confess, I miss them already… At least you’ll have one last list of new (to you?) teen books to read and enjoy! Are you ready to see what everyone had to say about their selection this month? Me too!

Megan: The Serpent King by Jeff Zenter, is the 2017 William C. Morris Award for a debut book published by a first-time author writing for teens. It tells the story of three teens living in a small Tennessee town in the heart of the Bible Belt. Dill is the grandson and son of preachers and their legacy is not a happy one. Grandpa Dill was a snake charmer who became unhinged after the death of his daughter and Dill’s father, also a Dill, is in prison. His mother wants him to leave school and help support the family, but his best friend Lydia wants him to go to college. Lydia is internet famous for her fashion blog and she is eager to leave her small town middle class life and strike out on her own in New York City. The third member of this odd little group is Travis, the gentle giant. He chooses to escape the abuse he suffers at the hand of his father by retreating into a fantasy world. This book is full of the big questions teens ask, friendship, tragedy, and hope. This is a fantastic coming of age story for fans of John Green and A.S. King

Gina: We Are Still Tornadoes is written in epistolary format, by Michael Kun and Susan Mullen. Discover the thoughts of these childhood friends, Cath and Scott after their high school graduation in the letters they write to each other the following year as pen pals. Cath moves out of state to attend college while Scott remains home to assist his father in the family store and starts a band with friends. They correspond throughout the year sharing their experiences, learning, and growing. Their letters bring them close together to realize that they are more than just friends. The addition of the 80’s music references made this book enjoyable.

Steve: The first book of the Ranger’s Apprentice series, The Ruins of Gorlan, by John Flanagan, is an awesome fantasy story that centers on an orphan named Will. On the Choosing Day none of the task masters choose him as an apprentice, that is until a Ranger ultimately requests him. Will is dutifully learning the ways of the Rangers, under the mentorship of the mysterious Halt, when his training is interrupted by news that the evil Morgarath is making maneuvers in an attempt to gain control of the kingdom. And then the real action begins.

Carol: In Jackaby by William Ritter, Abigail Rook comes to America in 1892 looking for adventure, and she is hired as an assistant to R.F. Jackaby, a mysterious detective who can see the paranormal. On Abigail’s first day, they are called to the scene of a murder. Jackaby is convinced that the killer is other-worldly and the game is afoot. This first in a series was published in 2014 and is a smart, funny and clever read—like a Sherlock novel, with a supernatural twist.

Sara: I read the young adult novel, The Unbecoming of Mara Dyer by Michelle Hodkin. It is the first in a trilogy about a 16 year old girl who wakes up in the hospital with no memory of the accident that put her there or how two friends and her boyfriend died in it. Her family moves to a new state, hoping Mara’s memory will come back gradually. Instead she begins hallucinating that she can see her dead friends and has premonitions of things before they happen. She also falls in love with a mysterious boy, Noah, who she feels like she has know for a lifetime. Were they destined to meet by forces beyond her control? And how did her friends die in the accident while she was unharmed? This book is a psychological (and perhaps paranormal) thriller, fast-paced and definitely worth reading.

Lauren: My Lady Jane by Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows is a delightfully ridiculous retelling of the story of Lady Jane Grey and King Edward VI. Their fantasy world centers on the clash between Verities, “normal people”…I guess, and Ethians, who have both a human and animal form and are widely seen as the scourge of the earth. An absolutely hilarious story of magic, adventure, and a little romance.

Dori: In Burn Baby Burn by Meg Medina, it’s the summer of 1977, and New York City is haunted by periodic blackouts, arson attacks and most menacingly by serial killer Son of Sam. Nora Lopez is about to graduate from high school and is thinking about her future while dealing with the stress of living with her single mother, a Cuban immigrant, and her younger brother Hector, a drug dealer who abuses his mother. To escape, Nora gets a job at a local deli and starts a relationship with Pablo, a handsome boy who works there too. As the city’s tension swirls around her, Nora must realize some hard truths while finding herself.

Beth: Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige is set in a dystopia Oz. When Amy finds herself displaced in Oz after a tornado, she learns that Oz is real, but it is not the Oz she had read about growing up. She’s tasked with saving Oz by taking down the all too powerful ruler, Dorothy.

Stacey: In Kids of Appetite, David Almond has been able to address serious issues with such subtle grace. Vic is struggling to cope with the loss of his father to cancer while watching his mom begin a relationship with someone new. Oh, and also Vic has Moebius Syndrome, a rare neurological disorder that paralyzes his facial muscles. Escaping the house with his father’s ashes, Vic stumbles upon a tight-knit group of outsiders (yep, a nod to the S.E. Hinton book!) each with their own troubles. When they find a message hidden in the urn, the clues lead the kids to discover memories of importance to Vic’s parents. Sweet but never sappy, with a message about kindness, compassion, and living with personal integrity, plus a quirky sense of humor; this book becomes something truly special.

Thank you for joining in and reading along with us for the last few years -I hope you’ve discovered an new favorite author (or two) and (like me) found a little love in your heart for a genre you previously felt “bleh!’ about! (I’m looking at *you* horror genre!)

enjoy!
Stacey

Gina’s 2016 Top 10 Books! December 16, 2016

Posted by Gina in Biographies, Book List, Fiction, Non-Fiction, Top Ten, Uncategorized.
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I’m still trying to find my reading style. This past year it has been a mix of nonfiction and fiction. I generally enjoy reading books before it is adapted into a movie, that way I can see the differences.

Yes, My Accent Is Real: and Some Other Things I Haven’t Told You by Kunal Nayyar

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

How to Be Single by Liz Tuccillo

Me Before You and After You by Jojo Moyes

Winter Stroll by Elin Hilderbrand

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, Parts 1 & 2 by John Tiffany, Jack Thorne, and J.K. Rowling

The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown

A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin

On My Own by Diane Rehm

 

I hope you enjoy these as much as I did! Happy Holidays!

-Gina

 

2016 Favorites – Top 12 Edition December 16, 2016

Posted by Dori in Book Awards, Book List, Book Review, Historical Fiction, Holiday Books, Literary Fiction, Mystery, Science Fiction, Suspense, Thrillers, Top Ten, Top Ten of 2016, Uncategorized.
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2016 was a book lover’s dream – I was like a kid in a candy store. Between reading and listening, I managed to finish a lot of literary fiction, and a few science fiction and suspense titles, but I have some catching up to do into 2017. Here are the books that I relished in 2016, in no particular order:

laroseLaRose by Louise Erdrich
Erdrich is a writer that I never miss and this book sums up what I love so much about her writing: devotion to characters, insightful commentary on American culture, family love and exploration of the mystical.

 

undergroundThe Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead
Deserved winner of the National Book Award, this book is a wildly creative and harrowing look at slavery and its legacy. A must read.

 

 

beforeBefore the Fall by Noah Hawley
Hawley, a screenwriter, deftly takes us through a horrific plane crash, exploring the survivor’s guilt and the investigation into the cause.

 

 

mynameMy Name is Lucy Barton by Elizabeth Strout
This small book packs a punch – mother/daughter relationships, poverty, marriage – are all addressed powerfully and in Lucy’s voice – lovely and sad.

 

 

vegetarianThe Vegetarian by Han Kang
There’s no doubt that this is a weird book – it’s about a young woman whose choice to become a vegetarian impacts her whole family in tragic ways – but it’s also both mesmerizing and beautiful.

 

 

queenQueen of the Night by Alexander Chee
Chee’s historical epic about a 19th century American who becomes a famous Parisian courtesan and opera singer envelops and transports you.

 

 

commonCommonwealth by Ann Patchett
This is my first Patchett novel and I may have to read her earlier books based on this one – who doesn’t love a book about a dysfunctional family that sucks you in and doesn’t let go?

 

 

multipleMultiple Choice by Alejandro Zambra
Zambra is a Chilean author and his books often deal with memory and choice within the framework of Chile’s recent authoritarian history. This one’s in the form of a multiple choice test

 

 

goldenThe Golden Age by Joan London
Maybe my favorite of all, London’s look at how people deal with displacement in their lives takes place during the polio epidemic in Australia after World War II. It’s surprisingly sweet and tender and you’ll fall in love with the characters.

 

 

moonglowMoonglow by Michael Chabon
History, relationships, life, love, rockets! – all in Chabon’s signature style.

 

 

 

swingSwing Time by Zadie Smith
I haven’t quite finished Smith’s latest about two young brown girls growing up in London and the different paths they take based on family, race, class and culture, but I’m entranced so far.

 

 

darker

 

gathering

A Darker Shade of Magic and A Gathering of Shadows by V.E. Schwab
I always like to dip into some great science fiction and I really enjoyed these first two in a series that take us to fantastic parallel worlds.  No. 3 is up next year!

 

BONUS CHRISTMAS BOOK:

fieldsThe Fields Where They Lay by Timonthy Hallinan
I chose this book for my Holiday read and I think I’ve found a new mystery series! It’s funny and clever and the mystery unfolded perfectly.

 

 

 

If` I could keep going, I’d throw these in as well: Debuts The Mothers by Brit Bennett and Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, The Yid by Paul Goldberg, To the Bright Edge of the World by Eowyn Ivey, A Hundred Thousand Worlds by Bob Proehl, A Great Reckoning by  master of mystery Louise Penney, The Hag-Seed by Margaret Atwood and The Nest by Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney.

Lauren’s Top Ten of 2016 December 16, 2016

Posted by Lauren in Book List, Thoughtful Ramblings, Top Ten, Top Ten of 2016, Uncategorized.
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Each year I worry that I won’t know what to come up with for my top ten list–this worrying lasts all of two seconds because as soon as I start to look back over a year’s worth of nose-in-a-book, I realize I read PLENTY of wonderful stuff!  This year my list is a little bit all over the place, just like my reading preferences.  Enjoy! ~Lauren

trespasser

The Trespasser by Tana French

amy-schumer

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo by Amy Schumer

felicia-day

You’re Never Weird on the Internet by Felicia Day

hamilton

Hamilton: The Revolution by Lin-Manuel Miranda

britt-marie

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

american-gods

American Gods by Neil Gaiman

ready-player-one

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

flavia

Thrice the Brinded Cath Hath Mew’d by Alan Bradley

gabby-b

The Universe Has Your Back: Transform Fear to Faith by Gabrielle Bernstein

mccullers

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers

BONUS SECTION: LATE TO THE PARTY

Here are a couple of extra favorites for me this year that I was inspired to read by my coworkers who picked them for their Top Ten lists last year. So if that initial plug wasn’t enough to motivate you, maybe my two-thumbs-up will help!

fates-and-furiesmount-charoctopus

Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff / The Library at Mount Char by Scott Hawkins / The Soul of an Octopus by Sy Montgomery

MENU December 15, 2016

Posted by Ann in Book List, Fiction, Mystery, Top Ten.
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MY FAVORITE BOOKS OF 2016

Tasty Appetizers

Descent by Tim Johnston

Unbecoming by Rebecca Scherm

Try Not to Breathe by Holly Seddon

Cruel, Beautiful World by Caroline Leavitt

Hearty Entrees

The Widow by Fiona Barton

Breaking Wild by Diane Les Becquets

Missing, Presumed by Susie Steiner

The City of Mirrors by Justin Cronin

The Poison Artist by Jonathan Moore

To Cleanse the Palate

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson

Dessert (the best for last!)

The Trespasser by Tana French

*With your Christmas Eve Hot Chocolate

Oliver, the Cat Who Saved Christmas by Sheila Norton    >’.'<

 

            ~Enjoy! Ann

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