Mistaken lyrical identity

You know how we often interpret emails and texts differently that they may have been meant? Tone of voice and gestures can create totally different meaning. And who hasn’t heard lyrics differently, not just meaning but the completely wrong words. Like hearing the classic Jimi Hendrix lyrics from “Purple Haze”: Excuse me while I kiss this guy. No wait, back it up, that’s: Excuse me while I kiss the sky.

bonnie tylerAnd the Bonnie Tyler song, “Total Eclipse of the Heart?” First of all, how many remember it?? And then did any of you know she was singing: Living in a powder keg and giving off sparks? I never had a clue…it became “hmmm hmm hm hmmm” and then hop back in with: I really need you tonight, forever’s gonna start tonight

Anyway, my latest is the Bastille song, “Pompeii“, I really thought they were singing: I’m beginning to be an optimist about this. Well, that misconception was just corrected for me to the detriment of my outlook. It’s really: How am I going to be an optimist about this. Of course, the video and the rest of the lyrics aren’t terribly upbeat, so I should’ve seen it didn’t fit…. Oh well, I think I’ll keep singing it with my interpretation!

— Julie

Handel this!

DanielleDeNiese

Was just listening to Danielle de Niese singing arias written by Handel, the composer of one of my favorite works, Water MusicI can understand the accolades she has received in the classical world. And in addition to the music, I enjoyed the lyrics as well – some were so dramatic! Not surprising for operas, I suppose… anyway, here are a couple:
“Da tempeste” (Giulio Cesare in Egitto – Act III, Scene 6; lyrics – Nicola Francesco Haym)

If a ship, buffeted by storms,

then reaches safe harbor,

it no longer knows what to wish for.

Thus the heart that finds solace

after enduring pain and despair

brings joy once more to the soul.

“Tornami a vagheggiar” (Alcina – Act I, Scene 14; lyrics – anon.)

Look with love on me again,

you alone will

this faithful soul adore,

my sweet beloved.

I have given you my heart,

my love will be constant;

never shall I be cruel to you

my beloved hope.

May your Friday reach operatic heights!

— Julie

The Poetry is the Thing

Wonder Working Stone I was reading a review of a new CD, A Wonder Working Stone, we are adding to the collection and a quote from one of the songs struck me: “Get over your tiny self/Because all days will end in joy.” The artist is Alasdair Roberts and although he started out recording traditional Scottish folk music, this is a album of mainly original compositions.

photo credit: Alex Woodward

I haven’t even listened to the music yet, but already love his poetry.

As I was flipping through the lyrics to find the song the review quote was from, again I was struck by his words in “Song Composed in December,” especially with recent events in Boston and other evils perpetrated by human beings against humanity.

Song Composed in December

This song’s made in anger, this song’s made in love
Where the croak of the hawk meets the coo of the dove
Where minstrelsy’s slander and rhyme turns to rage
To make a song about the renovation of the age

Woe to those who celebrate the taking up of violence
And woe to those who perpetrate delusions of their sirelands
Who’d fight for no reason with sword or with firebrand
Be they reiver in the border or raider in the highland

And joy to those who celebrate the breaking up of weapons
Who take a stand to raise a hand against oncoming slaughter
And joy to those who strive to give a voice to those with none
The fosterer of errant son and sire of wild daughter

And joy to those who’d use their songs as clues to find their clan
But woe to those who’d use them to enslave their fellow man

From open moor where kestrels soar on wings of beauty
To cloisters where vestals bear their palms of beauty
To waterfall tumbling, cascading and purling
To the flowery machair where the echo mocks the yellow yorlin

From forest deep where numens peep from every oaken bole
To city streets where people seek completion of the soul
For everyone with double bond of suffering to thole
I will sow a seed of honesty upon the bluebell knoll

There’s a little more to the song (including some Welsh rap!) than I am including in this post, but I will leave you to discover more of his words – and music- on your own.

— Julie

Words of a Butterfly

It’s time for another edition of “wisdom from my car stereo.” Well, perhaps wisdom isn’t quite it, but certainly “things-I-should-remember-when-life-is-bogging-me-down” applies. Today’s was courtesy of Butterfly Boucher from her CD: Scaryfragile. The song is “I found out” and the stanza I liked in particular:

I found out I can only be who I am

I can only do what I can

I won’t try to describe the relief

Retrieved 10/29/10 from: http://www.lyricsreg.com/lyrics/butterfly+boucher/I+Found+Out/

I’ve only listened to half of the CD so far but really like it and am looking forward to the drive home so I can finish!  Put it on hold in the catalog and read more about her.

— Julie

P.S. Check out the bass line and drums on track 2, “For the Love of Love” – nice.