Banned Books Week

The Glass Castle: A Memoir

by Jeannette Walls

Written in 2005, this is the story of Jeannette Walls, her 3 siblings, and their parents. Dad (Rex) was often drunk with the dream of building a glass castle, a home for his family, after he strikes it rich finding gold. Mom (Rose Mary) was an artist who loved spending time with painting much more than taking care of her family. The family never had a decent home and there was never enough food. They moved often, Dad called it the skedaddle, especially when bill collectors came looking for them. Birthdays and Christmas were seldom celebrated except for an occasional “gift” mom found on the street, in the trash, or at a thrift store. The children went to school hungry and seldom had anything for lunch except leftovers found in the trash. One by one the children left Virginia for New York City where three of the four become successful adults despite their childhood.

According to the American Library Association Office for Intellectual Freedom, The Glass Castle was on list of the top 10 most challenged books for 2012 because of offensive language and sexually explicit content.

~Emma

Banned Books Week 2021: Shannon’s Favorites

The logo for banned books week: a yellow banner with black text that reads "Banned Books Week" over an icon of a red book.

It’s Banned Books Week again, and now more than ever, it is important to talk to about censorship and the right to read. We as librarians stand against censorship and banning books, and in fact, some of my favorite books are on the list of the most frequently challenged books.

In honor of this important week, here are some of my favorite books from the list:

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas book cover + links to RRPL catalog

The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

A powerful, moving story ripped straight from the headlines, of a Black girl who was the only witness to her friend’s death at the hands of a police officer; this book is number 30 of the 100 most challenged books of the decade.

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi book cover that links to RRPL catalog.

Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi

An excellent graphic memoir that details the author’s childhood growing up in Iran during the Islamic Revolution; I read this in college and it changed my perspective on regular people living in the Middle East. Number 40.

The Giver by Lois Lowry book cover that links to RRPL's catalog.

The Giver by Lois Lowry

I read this dystopian classic in grade school, and it has remained one of my favorite books. It truly helped me see the world differently. This one is number 61.

Saga by Brian K. Vaughan book cover that links to RRPL's catalog.

Saga by Brian K. Vaughan

A beloved series of science fiction space opera graphic novels, Saga is often challenged in libraries due to violence and sexual content. This series come in at number 76 on the list of most challenged books of the decade.

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds
book cover that links to RRPL's catalog.

Stamped: Racism, Antiracism, and You by Ibram X. Kendi and Jason Reynolds
Number two on the list of most challenged books of 2020, this important book teaches racism to children of a new generation.

These are my favorite banned books, but plenty of books are challenged in libraries every day. To participate in Banned Books Week yourself, check out the Banned Books Week website for challenges, activities, interviews with authors, and more.

Image with two hands holding a book that reads: Censorship divides us. The picture is a link to the Banned Books Week website.