How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

This is the third movie released in theaters of this series. Since 2010 How to Train Your Dragon has been a popular series. There have been several TV specials, direct to DVD specials, and a Netflix series with 6 seasons. It’s also based on a book series by Cressida Cowell. To say this series is popular is an understatement. While DreamWorks creates the movies, this is the first trilogy ever to have three different studios release them. Paramount released the first, 20th Century Fox released How to Train Your Dragon 2, and Universal Studios released this one.

The movie starts off set a year after the second one. The team of dragon riders such as Hiccup played by Jay Baruchel and Astrid played by America Ferrera are working as a team to stop the dragon hunters. Valka, played by Cate Blanchett, acts as a mentor to the group of the young dragon riders on these missions. The group of dragon hunters band together, sick of the riders of Berk, and hire a mercenary called Grimmel, played by F. Murray Abraham, to capture Hiccup’s dragon Toothless to help them control the other dragons as Toothless is a king of dragons. Grimmel seems to be a brutal challenge with his own subdued dragons under his command. Grimmel has killed every night fury (the type of dragon Toothless is) and is determined to hunt Toothless down. ragons. Grimmel seems to be a brutal challenge with his own subdued dragons under his command. Grimmel has killed every night fury (the type of dragon Toothless is) and is determined to hunt Toothless down.

Toothless was thought to be the only dragon of his species left. They discover a dragon that has a white coloration of a night fury. It’s a female version of his species they nickname a “light fury”. Toothless is interested in finding out more about her. After a particularly dangerous attack by Grimmel, Hiccup decides to leave Berk with the rest of the village and their dragons to take them to the legendary home of dragons his father told him about, The Hidden World. As they travel they keep encountering the Light Fury and Hiccup starts to come to terms with the fact that he’s not the only one important to Toothless anymore.

The movie had some pretty good scenes and was funny at times. It didn’t feel quite as epic as How to Train Your Dragon 2but it was still satisfying. The ending wrapped things up well even if it’s not necessarily what everyone was hoping for. The series does tell a good story between Toothless and Hiccup. I wouldn’t be surprised if DreamWorks made some more stories for this world, particularly between the movies. So, it’s bittersweet for fans but a good journey. Rated PG.

By Ryan

Advertisements

Introduction

Hello Everybody,

            My name is Ryan and I see a lot of movies. So, I thought I’d try to share my experiences with them. I find that movies are a very good social experience that are fun to watch with someone and talk with people about later. I make it a point to try to see a movie if it sounds interesting or has high enough reviews. Sometimes a small tidbit of information can be the difference between seeing a movie or not for me.

Ralph Breaks the Internet

Wreck-It Ralph was a 2012 film that had Ralph (played by
John C. Reilly) a character from a video game struggling with the fact that he was a villain in his game. He goes on a journey to prove he’s a hero and ends up becoming friends with a girl called Vanellope (played by Sarah Silverman). After the events of that story, Ralph Breaks the Internet continues their story with Vanellope bored with her routine. Ralph tries to help her by making a new track one day and the player trying to steer the game ends up breaking the arcade game. When it seems like the game will be unplugged forever, they hear about the internet and a place where they can buy a replacement part.

The characters venture into the recently setup wifi at the arcade into the internet. They journey into the internet where they win a bidding war for their part and soon realize they need to earn money for it. They try a few ways to do so including trying to sell Shank’s car from another video game. Venellope becomes friends with Shank (played by Gal Gadot) as Shank’s racing game is much more intense than Vanellope’s. Ralph and Vanellope move on to try to use ad revenue from videos with the help of Yesss (played by Taraji P. Henson). Ralph starts making money to save the game. While advertising these videos, Vanellope even bumps into the Disney princesses at the Disney sight, with many of them voiced by their original voice actors.

Overall Ralph Breaks the Internet is cute and funny. Some parts could have gotten boring easily, but the movie keeps moving to prevent that. The movie mostly focuses on Vanellope’s journey of still feeling a bit out of place but also wanting more out of life. Ralph struggles with the idea of his friend moving onto bigger and better things. I think many people deal with this be it with family or friends. It’s really a fun movie that stays upbeat at most points. Good for watching with a family. Rated PG

By Ryan

Watch a Movie Based on a Book

Below are some suggestions of movies based on a book to encourage you to check off that box on your Winter Reading Bingo card.

Ready Player One is a science fiction film based on the 2011 dystopian novel of the same title by Ernest Cline.

Beautiful Boy is a biographical drama based on the 2008 memoir Beautiful Boy: A Father’s Journey Through His Son’s Addiction by David Sheff and the 2007 memoir Tweak: Growing Up On Methamphetamines by Nic Sheff

On Chesil Beach is a British drama film based on the 2007 Booker Prize nominated novella of the same title by Ian McEwan.

Juliet Naked is a romantic comedy/drama based on the 2009 novel of the same title by Nick Hornsby.

Crazy Rich Asians is a romantic comedy/drama based on the 2013 best selling novel of the same title by Kevin Kwan.

The Hate U Give is a crime drama based on the 2017 best selling young adult novel of the same title by Angie Thomas (released this month so place a hold or check out as a quick flick for 3 days)

A Wrinkle In Time is a science fantasy adventure film based on the 1962 juvenile novel of the same title by Madeleine L’Engle.

Black Panther is a super hero film based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name.

Red Sparrow is a spy thriller film based on the 2013 novel of the same title by Jason Matthews.

The Little Stranger is a gothic drama film based on the 2009 novel of the same title by Sarah Waters.

If you would like more suggestions stop by the Adult Reference desk and we are happy to help.

 

Mary’s Top Ten of 2018

Mary’s Top 10 for 2018

My Top 5 Books:

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai

There is so much to like about this book. The two main characters are flawed, however, you will yearn for them to rise up & come to terms with their lives.  I learned about Chicago (my home away from home), Paris, both present day and in the 1910’s, inspirational artists who were sowing their seeds in Paris in the early 1900’s, and last, but certainly not least, the AIDS epidemic at its height in  1980’s Chicago and its tragic aftermath.

 

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

This is a fantastic piece of historical fiction.  Sunja, the main character, is an unconventional matriarch, whom we follow throughout the entire story.  It begins in the early 1900’s with her birth, and culminates in 1989.  This story is about 4 generations of a Korean family coming terms with what it is like to be Korean in a Japanese society.  There is  much to learn here about the  perils and struggles of the Korean community.

 

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

This is another superb historical fiction book.  I learned a lot about tea… so much tea.  Again, the main character, Li-Yan, is unconventional, yet so strong in her own quiet ways.  The reader learns about farming tea, life in a small Chinese village, adapting to an ever-changing world, adoption and the impact, not only on the child, but the entire community.

 

Educated A Memoir by Tara Westover

I love good narrative nonfiction, and this certainly fit the bill.  It never ceases to amaze me when I read about the resilience of children growing up in a very chaotic environment, raised by a parent lacking in nearly all conventional parenting skills … and yet these children survive, and in this case, achieve great academic success despite the odds.  These type of books are great for book clubs because, trust me, you will want to talk about it.

 

Evicted by Matthew Desmond

This title was also the Library Community read.  Unlike, the book above, not everyone is a survivor in this one.  This book is about residents in low income neighborhoods in the city of Milwaukee, desperately trying to make ends meet, despite the unjust housing system in which they live in.  This is a very engaging, readable piece of nonfiction.

 

 

My Top 5 Movies:

Juliet Naked

I didn’t know that I liked Ethan Hawke so much. I have not watched a movie this year that he has starred in that I didn’t love ( Maudie and Maggie’s Plan both wonderful too).  This is a moving, yet feel-good kind of movie. It’s all about choices, second chances and moving forward.

 

Tully

I will admit that I nearly turned this movie off about 45 minutes in, and then everything changed, so hang in there.  Tully is such a simple yet complex woman struggling with “the baby blues”.  If you are like me, you will have compassion for Tully, you will understand Tully, in the end, you will love Tully.

I Am Not Your Negro

This film is a heartfelt & sweeping documentary of Alec Baldwin’s experiences in the tumultuous 60’s. You will be thinking about this one long after you hit the eject button. There is so much to learn about the great African American leaders, and the american experience of the African American community. We have so much to learn from our history, we simply need to take the time to listen.

Faces Places

I tried to stay away from Academy Award nominees & winners because they must be good, right?  Not always the case for me, but with this film, they hit the nail on the head.  Another feel-good film that follows a couple of artists pursuing…well, their art.  Their relationship is so charming, their travels are interesting, and their art is wonderful. What more do you need?

Amelie

Okay, I will admit I watched this one because I want to look like Amelie.  Who doesn’t want to look like an adorable French woman?  After watching this film, I want to be Amelie.  I want to be a free spirited, unique, adventurous, kind & beautiful young french woman…oh, and live in France.  For now I will live vicariously through this charming movie. By the way, it is in French, and watching foreign films makes me feel smart… another bonus!

Little Men

I eyed this film on the shelf FOREVER, and it did not disappoint. This is a wonderful coming of age story about a 13 year old boy, but so much more.  The film is about relationships, gentrification in Brooklyn, self discovery for the young and the old.  Don’t judge these characters to hastily, they may surprise you.

 

I hope you can make time for, at the least, one of my choices in 2019. I would LOVE to hear about your choices too.  Stop by at the Adult Reference desk & we’ll chat. Meanwhile, my best for a happy new year!

Byron’s Top Ten of 2018

Eight out of my top ten this year I listened to on CDs during my commutes. Half are written by women and half by men. Half of these also have a strong connection to Hollywood or the entertainment industry, which is one of my favorite subjects in both fiction and non-fiction. Try out some of these recommended titles for yourself and Happy Holidays!

Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter

narrated by Edoardo Ballerini

Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

narrated by Wil Wheaton

Coraline by Neil Gaiman

narrated by Neil Gaiman

Circe by Madeline Miller

narrated by Perdita Weeks

The Chaperone by Laura Moriarty

narrated by Elizabeth McGovern

The Girls in the Picture by Melanie Benjamin

narrated by Kimberly Farr

Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? by Frans de Waal

narrated by Sean Runnette

Quiet: The Power of Introverts in a World That Can’t Stop Talking by Susan Cain

narrated by Kathe Mazur

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

A Woman’s View: How Hollywood Spoke to Women, 1930-1960 by Jeanine Basinger

 

Bonus: Two 5 star films in my opinion. One deservedly received recognition in last year’s awards season. The other is in limited theatrical release right now, so you would have to wait for the movie to be available at our library.

Lady Bird (2017) directed by Greta Gerwig

Mirai (2018) directed by Mamoru Hosoda

“Keep the Change” might be the most important film I saw this year.

Something I learned, and continue to learn, as the sister to a brother who has Asperger Syndrome is that autistic people are not typically well understood in North American culture. Maybe this has something to do with who’s doing the storytelling. While a few films about people with autism have been released in recent years, the actors who tell the story aren’t always autistic.

This is what makes Keep the Change—and the fact that it won Best Picture at the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival—so important. It is a film about autistic people, based on the lives of real autistic people, played by autistic people. It’s a film that dignifies their lives, validates their experiences, and helps others understand their situations in a way that abled actors couldn’t convey.

keep the change2

In short, Keep the Change is about David, a thirty-something autistic man who, after telling a cop an inappropriate joke, is mandated to join a social skills group at the Jewish Community Center.

But it is about so much more than that. It’s a story about coming to terms with who you are, when you have long denied that you’re different. It’s about being a person with special needs in a family that looks down on and stigmatizes people who have special needs. It is about becoming part of a group of people like you, and admitting that you need their help. It’s about falling in love with one of those people, and the complications of being in a romantic relationship when you’re autistic (for instance, touching each other affectionately or going out on dates can be confusing and hard).

null

One of the words critics are using to describe Keep the Change is “disarming.” And it is that. The characters have brave, difficult conversations about the behavior of and attitudes toward people with special needs. In a particularly wince-worthy scene, David feels ashamed when his girlfriend, not understanding social cues, embarrasses him in front of a group of Broadway actors. He ends up angrily telling her to shut up, further embarrassing everyone present. While the film portrays the characters empathetically and thoughtfully, it doesn’t sugarcoat or romanticize autism.

keep the change 3

The film is also disarming in its sweetness. One scene that brought me to tears was when David took Sarah on a date at Coney Island. The two go on a ride together, and David, feeling overwhelmed by the lights and sounds around him, has a meltdown. Instead of judging him, Sarah gives him a hug. She receives him with tenderness and patience in a way that his family has not.

Another beautiful thing about the film is how vibrant, warm, and genuinely funny the supporting cast of autistic actors are. They are playing real people, not caricatures of autistic people. The joy and power they bring to the film is not something that abled actors playing autistic adults could replicate.

Our society needs stories that dignify and shed light on the lives of autistic people, and Keep the Change is one small but important step in that direction. I am so excited and proud that our library has selected it to be part of our collection.

Lyndsey