Winter Reading Bingo: Attend a Program

I will let you in on a secret. One of the easiest squares to fill on our bingo board is this one:

square

A book may take days to finish (possibly weeks, if you read as slowly as I do), but attending a library program? You could knock out that square in an hour.

Here are the exciting events coming up in January and February. I hope you can make it out to at least one of them!

use ju

Vision Poster Workshop
Saturday, January 19 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Registration required.

We will have scissors. And glue. And poster board. And a whooooole lot of magazines. Come think about your goals for the upcoming year, cut out images and words that speak to you, and turn the chaos of what 2019 could be into an inspirational collage.

1-31 knife skills2

Knife Skills Screening
Thursday, January 31 at 7:00 p.m.

Come see the Oscar-nominated short documentary about the Shaker Square restaurant that all of Cleveland is talking about. The screening will be followed by a Q&A with a representative from Edwins Leadership & Restaurant.

2-5 oscars

The Oscars Through the Years
Tuesday, February 5 at 7:00 p.m.

Learn the history of the awards and hear what a film scholar thinks about this year’s nominees for Best Picture.

2-11 rosa parks

Tea with Rosa Parks
Monday, February 11 at 7:00 p.m.
Rocky River Memorial Hall (next to the Don Umerley Center)
Registration required.

Celebrate Black History Month by hearing stories from Rosa Parks and Viola Liuzzo about their work in the Civil Rights Movement. Tea and pastries will be served.

2-28 date night

Date Night
Thursday, February 28
Pottery tour begins at 6:30 p.m. in the Grand Reading Room.
Concert begins at 7:15 in the Auditorium.

Is there a more romantic combination than music, Cowan Pottery, and dessert (all for free)? We think not.

Lyndsey

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Mary’s Top Ten of 2018

Mary’s Top 10 for 2018

My Top 5 Books:

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai

There is so much to like about this book. The two main characters are flawed, however, you will yearn for them to rise up & come to terms with their lives.  I learned about Chicago (my home away from home), Paris, both present day and in the 1910’s, inspirational artists who were sowing their seeds in Paris in the early 1900’s, and last, but certainly not least, the AIDS epidemic at its height in  1980’s Chicago and its tragic aftermath.

 

Pachinko by Min Jin Lee

This is a fantastic piece of historical fiction.  Sunja, the main character, is an unconventional matriarch, whom we follow throughout the entire story.  It begins in the early 1900’s with her birth, and culminates in 1989.  This story is about 4 generations of a Korean family coming terms with what it is like to be Korean in a Japanese society.  There is  much to learn here about the  perils and struggles of the Korean community.

 

The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane by Lisa See

This is another superb historical fiction book.  I learned a lot about tea… so much tea.  Again, the main character, Li-Yan, is unconventional, yet so strong in her own quiet ways.  The reader learns about farming tea, life in a small Chinese village, adapting to an ever-changing world, adoption and the impact, not only on the child, but the entire community.

 

Educated A Memoir by Tara Westover

I love good narrative nonfiction, and this certainly fit the bill.  It never ceases to amaze me when I read about the resilience of children growing up in a very chaotic environment, raised by a parent lacking in nearly all conventional parenting skills … and yet these children survive, and in this case, achieve great academic success despite the odds.  These type of books are great for book clubs because, trust me, you will want to talk about it.

 

Evicted by Matthew Desmond

This title was also the Library Community read.  Unlike, the book above, not everyone is a survivor in this one.  This book is about residents in low income neighborhoods in the city of Milwaukee, desperately trying to make ends meet, despite the unjust housing system in which they live in.  This is a very engaging, readable piece of nonfiction.

 

 

My Top 5 Movies:

Juliet Naked

I didn’t know that I liked Ethan Hawke so much. I have not watched a movie this year that he has starred in that I didn’t love ( Maudie and Maggie’s Plan both wonderful too).  This is a moving, yet feel-good kind of movie. It’s all about choices, second chances and moving forward.

 

Tully

I will admit that I nearly turned this movie off about 45 minutes in, and then everything changed, so hang in there.  Tully is such a simple yet complex woman struggling with “the baby blues”.  If you are like me, you will have compassion for Tully, you will understand Tully, in the end, you will love Tully.

I Am Not Your Negro

This film is a heartfelt & sweeping documentary of Alec Baldwin’s experiences in the tumultuous 60’s. You will be thinking about this one long after you hit the eject button. There is so much to learn about the great African American leaders, and the american experience of the African American community. We have so much to learn from our history, we simply need to take the time to listen.

Faces Places

I tried to stay away from Academy Award nominees & winners because they must be good, right?  Not always the case for me, but with this film, they hit the nail on the head.  Another feel-good film that follows a couple of artists pursuing…well, their art.  Their relationship is so charming, their travels are interesting, and their art is wonderful. What more do you need?

Amelie

Okay, I will admit I watched this one because I want to look like Amelie.  Who doesn’t want to look like an adorable French woman?  After watching this film, I want to be Amelie.  I want to be a free spirited, unique, adventurous, kind & beautiful young french woman…oh, and live in France.  For now I will live vicariously through this charming movie. By the way, it is in French, and watching foreign films makes me feel smart… another bonus!

Little Men

I eyed this film on the shelf FOREVER, and it did not disappoint. This is a wonderful coming of age story about a 13 year old boy, but so much more.  The film is about relationships, gentrification in Brooklyn, self discovery for the young and the old.  Don’t judge these characters to hastily, they may surprise you.

 

I hope you can make time for, at the least, one of my choices in 2019. I would LOVE to hear about your choices too.  Stop by at the Adult Reference desk & we’ll chat. Meanwhile, my best for a happy new year!

BookTalk for Adults

In case you missed the BookTalk for Adults program today at the library, here is what we talked about….

The Best Books of 2018 So Far. While there are many excellent books that have been penned thus far in 2018, I managed to widdle the list down to ten. The list spans different genres including fiction, literary fiction, mystery, suspense/thriller and memoir. Here is the list of books we discussed –

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai
Us Against You by Fredrik Backman
There, There by Tommy Orange
A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza
The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah
The President is Missing by Bill Clinton and James Patterson
All the Beautiful Lies by Peter Swanson
The Woman in the Window by A.J.Finn
When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger
Educated A Memoir by Tara Westover

Our next BookTalk for Adults will be Friday, October 26th at 10AM. Being so close to Halloween we will discuss (you guessed it) Spooky books. Come join us!

-The African American History Archives of the Western Reserve Historical Society- African-American History Month

Our next featured local resource is the African American Archives of the Western Reserve Historical Society.

Western Reserve Historical Society

Established in 1970, the archives mission is to “collect, preserve and make accessible historic documents, photographs, memorabilia, art, and artifacts pertaining to African American life, history and culture in Northeast Ohio.” Online you can browse through their catalog to see the archive’s holdings and its location within the Historical Society. Additionally they offer an useful subjects tab that lets you narrow your search results. It should be noted that there are materials that cover national history as well.

For information on the African American Archives Auxiliary or to find out how to support its work, contact:

Sherlynn Allen-Harris
African American Archives Auxiliary, Acting President
Western Reserve Historical Society, Board of Directors, Ex-Officio Member
sallenharris@ameritech.net

Additional programs at the Western Reserve Historical Society:

 

-Cleveland Historical- African-American History Month

Our first featured local resource is Cleveland Historical: “Developed by the Center for Public History + Digital Humanities at Cleveland State University, Cleveland Historical lets you explore the people, places, and moments that have shaped the city’s history.”

There is an amazing wealth of information on landmarks and events telling the story of life in Cleveland. This site offers pictures, recorded oral history, news clippings, and cited sources to continue your own research. They organize topics by “Tours” which is centered around a single topic and the different  Below is a link to African Americans in Cleveland, a Tour spanning over a 100 years of  public and personal accounts.

African Americans in Cleveland

Curated by The Cleveland Historical Team

Cleveland Historical
Euclid-East 105th Area, 1946 
Adonees Sarrouh and J. Mark Souther, “Cleveland’s Second Downtown,” Cleveland Historical, accessed February 5, 2018, https://clevelandhistorical.org/items/show/49.

African-American History Month

In observance of African-American History Month we will be highlighting local African-American history and research from the Cleveland and the Northeast Ohio area. To start off we have an article from two years ago by the Plain Dealer which was the source material for the text I used in the display in our library.

43 notable African-Americans with ties to Cleveland:

Celebrating

Black History Month

blackhistory month

-Greg

Libraries Are Awareness Creators

In observation of mental health awareness month, Rocky River Public Library will welcome author Sakeenah Francis to tell her story of living with paranoid schizophrenia. Ms. Francis will speak on Thursday, May 18 at 7:00 PM.

sakeenah

The event comes at an opportune time, with mental health appearing often in the headlines. What ramifications, if any, will the change in laws have for those in need of mental health care? Suicide rates are on the rise, while access to mental health care is becoming more limited. The media is buzzing about the controversial Netflix series 13 Reasons Why and its glamorized portrayal of suicide.

Our library, like many across the United States, aims to provide informational, educational, recreational, and cultural resources to patrons in the community. To me, community education starts with creating pockets of awareness. Sometimes this means giving patrons an opportunity to learn a skill, like cooking or jewelry making. Sometimes this means preparing patrons to transition well into the next stage of life, such as retirement or college.

Other times, this can mean giving a voice to people at the margins of society, in hopes of humanizing cancer patients or lifting stigmas around mental health. When we give Sakeenah a space to share her story, we are providing patrons an opportunity to become aware of her struggles and empathize with the situation she has found herself in. Same goes for Joanna Connors, a Cleveland writer and survivor of rape and PTSD, who spoke to us in February about her memoir, I Will Find You.

Some have challenged the idea that education can help eliminate stigma. In last week’s Crain’s New York article, How to Eliminate the Stigma Around Mental Illness, researcher and psychology professor Patrick Corrigan said, “Education is grossly overrated for changing the stigma of mental illness, especially for adults. Stigma doesn’t really change much when you go out and tell people what to think.”

While Corrigan didn’t define what, in his opinion, education is or is not, he said that meeting a person with a mental illness is a more effective route to normalizing mental illness and reducing stigma. He encouraged those affected by anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia to “come out everywhere.”

Corrigan seems to separate “formal” education and casual interactions, but I would argue that by providing authors a venue to tell their stories—placing books on our shelves or arranging a visit with an author—we are facilitating a hybrid of formal and casual that makes for deeply personal dialogue.

GRAPH

Library programs provide just enough structure to form a pocket where awareness can be created and empathy can be extended. I am proud of the library’s role in our community, and my role within the library, where planning programs that encourage community members to listen to one another is all in a day’s work.

Lyndsey