New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

These are the books we are adding to our collection this week. Click on the pink text to go to our catalog and place a hold today!

Fierce Little Thing by Miranda Beverly-Whittemore – Five friends are blackmailed into returning to the cult where they were raised to face their shared monstrous secret.

Women’s March, The: A Novel of the 1913 Woman Suffrage Procession by Jennifer Chiaverini – Inspired by actual events, this novel offers a fascinating account of a crucial but little-remembered moment in American history that follows three courageous women who bravely risked their lives and liberty in the fight to win the vote.

Devil in Disguise by Lisa Kleypas – A young window, Lady Merritt Sterling, tries to avoid London society scandals while running her late husband’s shipping business, but her sensible plans disappear when she meets a rugged Scotch whisky distiller who is running from danger.

The Forbidden by Heather Graham – When a real murder occurs on set, actress Avalon Morgan is led to the darkest corners of the internet where killers confess their crimes—a discovery that puts her in the path of a killer and in the arms of an FBI agent working the case.

Godspeed by Nickolas Butler – The principals of True Triangle Construction seem willing to do anything to get their promised payday from a mysteriously wealthy homeowner for a project in Jackson, Wyoming in the new novel from the best-selling and award-winning author of Shotgun Lovesongs.

Just One Look by Lindsay Cameron – After taking a thankless job as a temp at a law firm, Cassie Woodson begins reading the personal emails between a partner and his enchanting wife and becomes so obsessed with the pair, she plots to take her place.

Not a Happy Family by Shari Lapena – When their parents are brutally murdered the night after Easter dinner, three siblings, who stand to inherit millions, are devastated but also wonder if one of them is capable of murder or if a stranger was responsible for tearing this not-so-happy family apart.

Robert Ludlum’s the Bourne Treachery by Brian Freeman – A lone operative working in the shadows for Treadstone, Jason Bourne engages in a cat-and-mouse game with Lennon across the British countryside in an attempt to prevent another assassination—a mission that calls into question everything he thought he knew about the past.

A Good Day for Chardonnay by Darynda Jones – The sheriff of a small-town police force in the New Mexico mountains tackles a crazy bar fight and her teenager hunting a serial killer in the second novel of the series following A Bad Day for Sunshine.

Unthinkable by Brad Parks – Kidnapped by the head of a powerful secret society who believes he can stop millions of people from dying, Nate Lovejoy, a self-proclaimed nobody and stay-at-home dad, must do the unthinkable to save the world.

A Song Everlasting by Ha Jin – Yao Tan, a popular singer, is placed on a government blacklist and can never return to China after performing at a private gig sponsored by a supporter of Taiwan’s secession, in the new novel from the award-winning author of Waiting.

Three Words for Goodbye by Hazel Gaynor & Heather Webb – Estranged sisters Clara and Madeleine Sommers reunite to honor their grandmother’s dying wish—to travel across Europe together and deliver three farewell letters, a journey during which they are constantly at odds with each other until a shocking family secret brings them closer than ever before.

~Semanur

Discover@RRPL

The Berlin Girl

by Mandy Robotham

It’s 1938 when London journalists Georgie Young and Max Spencer are assigned to Berlin. Their job is to report on events as Hitler’s Germany marches toward war. The freedoms and rights of the Jewish people are quickly disappearing. Georgie hires Rubin Amsel as her driver. Rubin and his wife Sara are Jewish. Sara’s brother Elias is handicapped, and the Nazis are anxious to house those they consider undesirable in prison camps like Sachsenhausen near Berlin. When Elias is taken away, Rubin and his wife Sara send their children away to England to keep them safe. Soon Georgie captures the attention of Kasper, a Nazi officer. They go out a few times and Georgie hopes to garner information to obtain freedom for Elias. When Max is taken into Nazi custody and as he is being transferred to Sachsenhausen, Georgie helps him escape.

Georgie and Max recognized the danger of the Nazi government and tried to warn what was to come in their articles sent back to London. Many turned a blind eye. This is a book for anyone interested in pre-war Germany.

~Emma

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here some of the new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

Better to Have Gone: Love, Death, and the Quest for Utopia in Auroville by Akash Kapur – Explores the lives, and ultimate deaths, of two people in a utopian community in India.

When We Were Young by Richard Roper – In order to find their way back to the truth and to their friendship, two long-lost friends honor a promise they made years ago to walk all 184 miles of the Thames Path.

False Witness by Karin Slaughter – Defense attorney Leigh Collier is taken aback when she discovers her new, high profile case will be defending her childhood abuser in the new novel from the New York Times best-selling author of Pieces of Her.

The Man With the Silver Saab by Alexander McCall Smith – A detective in Malmo’s Department of Sensitive Crimes, Ulf Varg, while dealing with surprising new cases, struggles with his feelings for a colleague.

For Your Own Good by Samantha Downing – Belmont Academy’s Teacher of the Year, Teddy Crutcher is frustrated by his colleagues and endlessly meddlesome parents who begin digging a bit too deeply into his affairs after the death of an Academy parent and his seemingly missing wife.

She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker Chan – When the Zhu family’s eighth-born son, Zhu Chongban, given the fate of greatness, dies during a brutal attack, his sister, escaping her own fated death, uses her brother’s identity to claim another future altogether—her brother’s abandoned greatness.

Intimacies by Katie Kitamura – Seeking a fresh start an interpreter takes a position at the International Court at The Hague and is drawn into numerous personal dramas, including her lover’s ongoing entanglement in his marriage and her friend witnessing a random act of violence.

A Woman of Intelligence by Karin Tanabe – A former translator at the United Nations who has become a bored 1950s housewife is asked to join the FBI as an informant after a man from her past has become a high-level Soviet spy.

What Strange Paradise by Omar El Akkad – Looking at the global refugee crisis through the eyes of a child, this dramatic story follows Vänna who comes to the rescue of a 9-year-old Syrian boy who has washed up on the shores of her small island and is determined to do whatever it takes to save him.

Until Proven Safe: The History and Future of Quarantine by Geoff Manaugh & Nicola Twilley – Helping us make sense of our new reality, this timely book tracks the history and future of quarantine around the globe, chasing the story of emergency isolation through time and space.

~Semanur

Review of She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan

She Who Became the Sun by Shelley Parker-Chan book cover and catalog link

In an exciting and fresh new historical fantasy debut, after an orphaned young girl is told that she is destined for nothingness by a fortune teller, she instead takes the fate of greatness that was meant for her deceased twin brother. Pretending to be a boy, the peasant girl Zhu becomes a monk, a soldier, and eventually a general in her quest to seize greatness and wrest control of ancient China from the Mongol Empire. 

Besides being a gripping feminist reimagining of Chinese history, the novel employs a refreshingly original magic system that is tied in with Chinese beliefs and historical facts. In an fascinating twist, the concept of the ‘mandate of heaven’ that defined who had the right to rule in historical ancient China becomes an actual flame that the chosen few can summon. The characters are complex and layered, especially Zhu, with robust queer representation and exploration of gender beyond the binary. Parker-Chan deftly explores what someone will do to survive, whether that is to compromise their values or even kill in cold blood, which is also tied in with the lure of power and womanhood in ancient China. The concept of immutable fate is central to the story – and in less-skilled hands could be boring – but Parker-Chan plays with the uncertainty of how Zhu’s fate will be achieved, and for how long she will keep the greatness she is promised. This is a top-notch historical fantasy novel (and the first installment of a duology) with a complicated, ruthless female lead – for anyone who enjoyed And I Darken by Kiersten White. 

Published on July 22, 2021.

ARC (advance reader copy) courtesy of NetGalley.

Fast Girls: A Novel of the 1936 Women’s Olympic Team by Elise Hooper

If you are all caught up on this week’s Buddy Read of Bicycling with Butterflies: My 10,201-Mile Journey Following the Monarch Migration by Sara Dykman and you’ve mulled over the discussion questions, and your thoughts are drifting to the upcoming Olympic games, then you might be interested in the book Fast Girls by Elise Hooper.

Fast Girls is a fictionalized account of the US Women’s Track team in the 1936 Olympics and the events that lead to Betty Robinson, Louise Stokes, Helen Stephens, and their teammates competing in the Nazi-sponsored games. While Jesse Owens was the public star of the games that same year, these trailblazing women were quietly carving out a place for themselves in history.

Betty Robinson:

The 1928 Olympics in Amsterdam marked the first time women were allowed to compete in track events. Seventeen year old Betty won the gold in the 100 m race, matching the world record time, and took the silver in the women’s 4×100 relay. Robinson missed the 1932 Los Angeles Olympic Games following a near death accident. She fought her way back to competition strength to earn a place on the 1936 team.

Louise Stokes:

Louise Stokes and Tiyde Pickett were the first Black women to be selected to compete in the Olympic after qualifying in the 1932 Olympic trials. Both women accompanied the US team to Los Angeles, but both were left off of the relay team that year. Stokes and Pickett were both among the eighteen Black athletes at the 1936 games. Stokes was once again left off the relay roster, failing to compete for a second time. She was welcomed home to Malden, Massachusetts with a hero’s welcome and she went on to found the Colored Women’s Bowling League.

Helen Stephens:

Helen, the “Fulton Flash” Stephens was a sprinter who never lost a race in her career. At 18 she competed against and beat Stanisława Walasiewicz (aka Stella Walsh-Clevelanders may recognize her name!), the reigning champion and world record holder in the 100 m race. While in Berlin, she had an unpleasant encounter with Adolph Hitler. Shortly after the Olympics she retired from running, but went on to play professional baseball and softball and eventually became the first woman to own and manage a semi-professional basketball team.

All of these amazing women overcame different hardships in order to pursue their dreams. While the world remembers the name Jesse Owens, these women also raced their way in to Olympic history in 1936. If you like captivating historical fiction, courageous women, and a good underdog story, you’ll probably enjoy Fast Girls. Don’t be surprised if you find yourself putting down the story to further research the events in the book. Their stories are heartbreaking and inspiring and deserve to be known.

~Megan

New Books Tuesday@ RRPL

These are the books we are adding to our collection this week. Click on the purple text to go to our catalog and place a hold today!

The Woman They Could Not Silence by Kate Moore – In 1860, Elizabeth Packard, committed to an insane asylum by her traitorous husband, becomes a champion for the many rational women on her ward, discovering that the merit of losing everything is that you then have nothing to lose.

The Secret Keeper of Jaipur by Alka Joshi – Back in the Pink City where he was once a wily street urchin, Malik, assigned to help Samir Singh’s feckless son Ravi build the new public cinema, finds his livelihood, reputation and the people he loves most threatened after Ravi implicates him in a ruthless scandal.

Songs in Ursa Major by Emma Brodie – The year is 1969, and the Bayleen Island Folk Fest is abuzz with one name: Jesse Reid, whose intricate guitar riffs and supple baritone are poised to tip from fame to legend with this one headlining performance. That is, until his motorcycle crashes on the way to the show.

Dream Girl by Laura Lippman – Bedridden after a freak accident, a novelist begins to question his own sanity as he moves through dreamlike memories of his own fictional characters in the follow-up to the New York Times best-selling Lady in the Lake.

Blush by Jamie Brenner – Returning with her mother to her parents’ North Fork Long Island winery, college-age Sadie discovers that her Grandma Vivian once ran a “trashy” book club and decides to reinstate it as a way to reconnect the family.

Sunrise by the Sea by Jenny Colgan – Moving to a Cornish seaside village, hoping for peace and solitude, lonely registrar Marisa Rosso, feeling like life is passing her by, unexpectedly finds her joy again with the help of her noisy neighbor, the community spirit and a campaign to save the local bakery.

Filthy Animals by Brandon Taylor – The author of the Booker Prize finalist Real Life presents a group portrait of young adults enmeshed in desire and violence.

The Summer of No Attachments by Lori Foster – Two best friends, local veterinarian Ivy Anders, who has a strict no-strings rule towards people, and Roxi, an assault survivor, each discover the rewards of opening their heart and letting others in when a pair of brothers arrive in town with an angry little boy in tow.

What a Dog Knows by Susan Wilson – From the New York Times best-selling author comes another heartwarming novel about humans and the dogs that change our lives.

Suburban Dicks by Fabian Nicieza – A mystery featuring two amateur sleuths examines the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant.

The Perfect Murder by Kat Martin – Surviving a helicopter crash, millionaire Reese Garrett, in the middle of purchasing the Poseidon offshore drilling platform, must discover who wants him dead while keeping his lover, Kenzie, who has been accused of her ex-husband’s murder, and her young son safe from a killer.

Moon Lake by Joe R. Lansdale – Returning to Moon Lake, the place where his father tried to kill them both, Daniel Russell, attempting to finally put to rest the memories that have plagued him for tears, discovers something even more shocking that is linked to dark deeds, old grudges and strange murders.

~Semanur

Discover@RRPL

The Last Green Valley

by Mark Sullivan

Based on a little-known tale of the war and its aftermath, it’s 1944 when Emil and Adeline Martel are forced to make a life-changing decision. Stalin’s forces are pushing into Ukraine. The couple and their two young sons can stay and continue to suffer under Stalin’s reign of terror or move west. The Nazis pledged to protect “pure-blood” Germans if they leave Ukraine. When Emil is captured and deported to a Russian prison camp, he pleads with his wife to continue moving west. Emile promises to find Adeline and the boys.

Thanks to the Red Cross, the family is eventually reunited. Fortunately, Adeline has distant relatives in Montana who offer them a place to stay on their farm. Neither Emil or Adeline are idle and they don’t stay with Adeline’s relatives for long. Soon Emil builds a house for his family. He then starts his own construction company which successfully provides for his family and many others.

Despite the hardships described, this is a moving story of love, faith and one family’s incredible will to survive. Much of the book is based on historical fact.

~Emma

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Check out this selection of new releases for your enjoyment coming this week!

Bath Haus by P. J. Vernon – When an attempted tryst in a gay bathhouse almost turns deadly, recovering addict Oliver Park finds his carefully rebuilt life unraveling.

Widespread Panic by James Ellroy – In the 1950s, Freddy Otash, the Tattle Tyrant for Confidential magazine who held Hollywood hostage, decides to tell all, in this tale of pervasive paranoia teeming with communist conspiracies, FBI finks, celebrity smut films, and strange bedfellows.

Notorious by Diana Palmer – To escape from family members who are after her inheritance, Texas heiress Gaby Dupont, assuming a new identity, starts working for a powerful Chicago lawyer who comes to her aid when her greedy relatives track her down.

The Damage by Caitlin Wahrer – When a small-town family is pushed to the brink, how far will they go to protect one of their own?

The Maidens by Alex Michaelides – When a member of a secret society known as The Maidens is murdered, a brilliant, but troubled, group therapist finds her obsession with proving the guilt of an untouchable Cambridge University professor spiraling out of control, threatening to destroy her credibility as well as her life.

The Great Mistake by Jonathan Lee – From the acclaimed author of High Dive comes a novel of New York City at the turn of the 20th century, a story of one man’s rise to fame and fortune, and his mysterious murder.

Nowhere Girl: A Memoir of a Fugitive Childhood by Cheryl Diamond – In this impossible-to-believe true story of self-discovery and triumph, the author, born into a family of outlaws with no proof that she even existed, shares her escape from the only people she had in the world in order to survive.

Beyond by Mercedes Lackey – The long-awaited founding of Valdemar comes to life in this new series from a New York Times best-selling author.

The Godmothers by Camille Aubray – Godmothers to one another’s children, four women, who married into a prosperous Italian family, must come together, despite secrets and betrayals, when their husbands are forced to leave them during WW II, pitting them against notorious gangsters who run the streets of New York City.

The Outlier: The Unfinished Presidency of Jimmy Carter by Kai Bird – An expert biographer and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of American Prometheus, drawing on interviews with members of Carter’s administration as well as recently unclassified documents from his presidential library, reevaluated the complex triumphs and tragedies of Jimmy Carter’s presidential legacy.

~Semanur

New Books Tuesday @ RRPL

Here we have some new exciting releases for you to take a look at this week!

Rabbits by Terry Miles – Conspiracies abound in this surreal and yet all-too-real technothriller in which a deadly underground alternate reality game might just be altering reality itself, set in the same world as the popular Rabbits podcast.

Animal by Lisa Taddeo – Joan returns to Los Angeles to come to terms with a childhood trauma and forge the power to fight back against the people who hurt her in a new novel by the author of Three Women.

One Two Three by Laurie Frankel – The Mitchell sisters – teenage triplets – find everything changing in their town when a handsome new student enrolls at Bourne Memorial High who happens to be their family’s sworn enemy.

Castle Shade by Laurie King – Queen Marie of Romania, granddaughter to both Queen Victoria and Tsar Alexander II calls on Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes to investigate a series of strange accidents in Castle Bran in the latest addition to the series following Riviera Gold.

Love for Beginners by Jill Shalvis – Starting a new life after waking up from a coma, Emma Harris finds her plans of opening up a doggy day care derailed by her childhood nemesis, but she soon learns that life isn’t what you are given, it’s what you make of it.

Pack Up the Moon by Kristan Higgins – When his wife leaves him letters, one for every month in the year after her death, Joshua is led on a journey of pain, anger and denial that eventually makes room for laughter and new relationships.

The Bullet by Iris Johansen – Eve Duncan puts her happily-ever-after with Joe on hold when his ex-wife shows up, on the run with enough secrets to get them all killed.

The Disappearing Act by Catherine Steadman – A British actress new to Hollywood, Mia Eliot is forced to play the role of a lifetime when a girl she only met once disappears and an imposter shows up in her place, forcing her to question her sanity as the truth goes beyond anything she could have ever imagined.

The President’s Daughter by James Patterson – A one-time Navy SEAL and past president, Matthew Keating, after his daughter is kidnapped by a madman, embarks on a one-man special-ops mission that tests his strengths as a leader, a warrior, and a father.

Tom Clancy Target Acquired by Don Bentley – Taking on a cushy assignment in Israel at the request of Ding Chavez, Jack Ryan Jr. finds himself the target of trained killers after helps a woman and her young son, forcing him to use all his skills to protect the life of the child.

The Stepsisters by Susan Mallery – Brought back together when Cassidy, the little sister they have in common, suddenly needs them both, Daisy and Sage must cast aside their hatred for each other to care for Cassidy and are caught off guard when long-buried secrets lead to forgiveness and a powerful friendship.

The Hidden Palace by Helene Wecker – Pretending to be human, magical beings Chava, a golem, and Ahmad, a jinni, find their lives intertwined as they try to make sense of the world around them and the people whose lives they have unwittingly affected.

~Semanur