Imagine your story–Sunny days of summer

 

Quarantine or no, summer is here.  The sound of lawnmowers, and the smell of barbecue fills the air.  Some people associate reading a good book with the winter months- cozied up in front of the fire.  But my best memories of reading are being outside, in the shady grass or on a blanket by the pool.  After our months of being quarantined indoors, it’s finally time to spread our wings (safely and distantly) to the outdoors.  No need to feel guilty about not cleaning the house and reading a book instead–you are spending time outside!  How many times did your mom tell you to do just that?!  Here’s a list of June titles to enjoy while you appreciate the space and freedom of a summer day.

What We’re Reading Now…..

Fleishman Is In Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner

Fleishman Is in Trouble: A Novel by Taffy…

Meet recently separated Toby Fleishman, medical professional by day, kids every other weekend, newbie bachelor exploring the the singles scene through a dating app on his phone. Toby’s life has been turned upside down by his ex-wife’s disappearance.  Has she truly disappeared, is she avoiding Toby and their shared responsibilities with their kids, or is she having a nervous breakdown?  Toby will embark on a desperate search for his ex-wife while juggling his career and trying to parent 2 unraveling kids.  Don’t pass this book up.  From the outside it seems like another “Bridget Jones ” type story, but there is much more here to enjoy and explore. This book is witty, fast-paced, with sharp observations about marriage, divorce and parenting in today’s world.  Mary

The Tale of the Genji by Murasaki Shikibu

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This is the tale of the ‘shining’ Genji, the favorite son the Japanese Emperor, and Genji’s many romantic dalliances and the resulting political consequences. While a bit of slog at roughly 1200 pages and with an unsympathetic main character, this novel, argued by many to be the world’s first novel, fascinatingly details the intricate court life of a thousand years ago in Heian Period Japan. Trent

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

Ninth House by Leigh Bardugo

High school dropout Galaxy “Alex” Stern has narrowly escaped her disastrous Los Angeles past of drug dealer boyfriends and violence, awakening in a hospital bed the sole survivor of a gruesome multiple homicide. While recovering, she is offered a strange but irrefutable second chance: attend Yale completely free of cost if she serves as the new “Dante” for Lethe. Lethe is the Ninth House of the Houses of the Veil, secret societies at Yale that generally practice magic to ensure their own professional success and financial security. Alex is responsible for overseeing the rituals and magic of the other eight houses, assuring everyone involved survives and that no dangerous magic escapes. Soon though a young woman is found brutally murdered on campus and Alex suspects magic was involved. Wildly atmospheric and emotional charged, this page-turner is highly recommended for fans of dark adult fantasy. Nicole

The Topeka School by Ben Lerner

The Topeka School: A Novel by Ben Lerner

Lerner is one of my favorite contemporary novelists.  Whenever I read one of his books, I feel that he is describing aspects of my own experience, but much better than I could ever do – sort of giving me the words, or some words, I guess, that make sense to me, and help me understand my own life up to this point.  The Topeka School is a fictional take on Lerner’s adolescence – he grew up in the Midwest, Jewish, white and privileged, but also experienced anomie, rootlessness, angst, all the blues that come with being a teenager.  The novel is very smart, poignant, and incisive, as well as experimental in ways I find really interesting and exciting. Recommended as a fascinating study of violence, whiteness and maleness, that is not afraid to be both honest and compassionate.  Andrew

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

Binti by Nnedi Okorafor

Nebula and Hugo Award winning Binti by Nnedi Okorafor is a quick placed novella that introduces the reader to Binti as she leaves home to study at the most prestigious university in the galaxy, Oomza University. The author propels the reader into a futuristic world where marvels of technology live as the everyday and intergalactic travel is routine.  At times the amount of new information and fast pace can be a bit overwhelming, but when enjoyed as a whole series (there are two sequels that expand on many of the terms, concepts introduced) the reader is presented with a rich narrative that explores heroism, growth, and family.  Greg

The Woman in the White Kimono by Ana Johns

The Woman in the White Kimono by Ana Johns

It is 1957 and Naoko Nakamura wants to marry American serviceman Jimmy Kovac. Her family has other plans for her including an arranged marriage. Pregnant Naoko leaves her family’s home to marry Jimmy. When Jimmy is away, Naoko finds herself in a maternity home designed to take care of unwanted pregnancies, namely mixed-race children. Eventually Naoko escapes from the maternity home and her sickly baby is born. Decades later in Ohio Jimmy’s daughter, Tori, is given a letter from her father on his deathbed to be given to Naoko in Japan. Tori is determined to find her half-sister. This is an enjoyable well-researched piece of historical fiction.  Emma

Inland by Tea Obrecht

Inland by Tea Obreht

Two lives unfold in the late 19th century American West in Inland by Tea Obrecht. A duel narrative, we hear the story of Lurie, a former outlaw and a man haunted by ghosts, lost souls who always want something from him. Lurie’s mysterious traveling companion hears his story. Meanwhile, Nora awaits the return of her sons and her husband in drought stricken Arizona while conversing with her daughter, who died in infancy. Haunted by their pasts, Nora and Lurie do what they can to survive. I listened to the audiobook, which was transporting, with talented narrators who really captured the characters. Dori

El Norte: The Epic and Forgotten Story of Hispanic North America by Carrie Gibson

El Norte: the epic and forgotten story of…

A deep detailed history of the Caribbean and North America with a little coverage of major events in Meso and South America. The Spanish have older roots here than the English. Written records like diary entries and letters by government and church administrators are quoted as often as possible. Gibson is specific also about the different ingenious cultures (ex. Tainos, Maya, Apalachee, and Zuni) encountered. It is a thick history book and is taking quite a commitment of time to work through it, but I am finding it constantly fascinating.  Byron

The Sun and the Sand

Officially, summer doesn’t end until September 23rd, but we all know that the unofficial ending of summer is when the kids go back to school. So, let’s grab the few days we have left and head out to the beach or the closest swimming pool! And if you’re working (like me) or don’t like the heat, the bugs or the people, enjoy some beachly entertainment like the suggestions below:

Cover image for The way way backCover image for Beach blanket bingoCover image for The endless summer

 

Cover image for Sag Harbor :Cover image for On Chesil Beach :Cover image for On the island :

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

See you at the beach!

Dori

 

 

What we’re reading now….

Before She Knew Him by Peter Swanson

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This is a slightly twisted thriller that takes place in the suburbs of Boston.  Henrietta and her husband Llody move to a new suburb for a change of scenery.  Before they know it they are attending a dinner party at their neighbor’s house, and Hen stumbles on a suspicious clue that potentially links her neighbor to a murder in their old town.  Things quickly escalate as the story unfolds, and nothing is quite like it seems.  Beth

Silent City by Alex Segura

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Due to his drinking, Pete is barely holding on to his dead-end and unfulfilling sports editor job with the Miami Herald, and his social life is a mess.  Pete is half-in-the-bag and skipping on work when he accepts the request from the Herald’s washed-up columnist to search for his missing daughter.  Not really remembering why he agreed to help, Pete figures he will make a few calls to mutual acquaintances and ends up stumbling around and stirring up trouble as he plays detective. Silent City is Segura’s first in the Peter Fernandez series.  The recently published fourth installment, Blackout, is nominated for the Anthony Award to be announced in November. Trent

Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert

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I am reading this for our Classic Book Discussion on Monday, August 12, at 7pm.  I have just finished part one and started part two (there are three parts).  The novel was written in French and published in 1856 (I am reading the more recent translation into English by Lydia Davis); when it was first published, in serialized form, the government brought an action against it for immorality (!) – the charge was acquitted.  The book is absolutely marvelous – the writing is really uncanny and exquisite, almost perfect in a way, and is the first example of what is called “literary realism,” a technique that we are now habituated to experience when reading novels, but was in many ways inaugurated by Flaubert.  Put simply, the book is about a dissatisfied and romantic heroine, Emma Bovary, who seeks to escape the boredom and banality of her life through increasingly desperate acts.  If you are interested, please procure a copy of the book, read it (and hopefully enjoy it), and come on August 12 to discuss.    Andrew

 The Library of Lost and Found by Phaedra Patrick

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This is the story of Martha Storm who volunteers at her local library. She lives in her childhood home surrounded by her dead parents’ possessions along with various projects she plans to finish for others. Martha receives a mysterious book signed and dated by her grandmother, Zelda, who supposedly died years before the date of inscription. Martha is determined to understand what happened and uncover any family secrets. This is a charming story with a happy ending.  Emma

Inheritance: A Memoir of Genealogy, Paternity and Love by Dani Shapiro

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In 2016 author, Dani Shapiro, on a lark, decided to submit her DNA for analysis at a genealogy website.  Soon after she received the stunning news that her father was not her biological father.   Dani Shapiro urgently begins a quest to unlock the story of her own identity.  She unfolds many secrets kept for a myriad of reasons.  He journey is a compelling story of paternity, identity and belonging.  This story is more a personal journey than a scientific journey.  I did find the author to be self absorbed at times, however, I am empathetic with the tremendous emotional upheaval this discovery caused the author.  A quick and interesting read.  Mary     

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep 

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This the story of the murder of Willie Maxwell, a southern preacher who was accused of murdering five people in order to collect the insurance money, the lawyer who defended the both Reverend Maxwell and the man accused of murdering him, and Harper Lee, the author seeking to write her own In Cold Blood.  This book reads like three separate stories, beginning with Willie Maxwell,  his alleged victims, and rumors of voodoo. Tim Landry, his charismatic lawyer is introduced to readers as the man who won acquittals in five murder trials. It is Harper Lee that ties these stories together. Readers are treated to a detailed biography of Nelle Harper Lee, including tales from her childhood, accounts of her friendship with Truman Capote, and details of her complicated writing career.  This is a real treat for true crime lovers and fans of Harper Lee.  Megan

Pieces of Her by Karin Slaughter

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Andrea Cooper knows her mother Laura–a strong woman who has protected, loved and taken care of her for her whole life. Andrea, after an unsuccessful attempt at making it big in New York City, has come back home to her small childhood town of Belle Isle, GA to take care of her mother who has been diagnosed with breast cancer . She thinks she knows everything about the sleepy town and her never changing mother–until a mall shooter almost kills them both, and Laura takes him down like some sort of NAVY seal operative. It turns out her mother used to be someone else, and if Andrea doesn’t figure out who that person was, why her mother is in hiding or who is after her, they both may not make it. Sara

Ghost by Jason Reynolds

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This is a story about a poor teen who joins a city wide track team. He’s never been part of a team before. His mother is working and putting herself through college. He frequently gets in trouble at school because his classmates make fun of the neighborhood where he lives, his ill-fitting clothes, the fact that his mother cuts his hair, everything associated with being poor. Can he adapt to the rules at track practice with Coach and find a place among the other young runners? Reynolds writes in a way that definitely gets inside the head of this teenager. I became interested in this title when I heard the author speak as part of the PBS Great American Reads series, and it is another part of my effort to read books from more diverse voices. So far it is very relatable even though I never participated on a sports team in school myself. Byron

Summer Reading: The Most Wonderful Time of The Year!

Good news, neighbors, summer has finally arrived here in Ohio! What goes better with sunshine and sitting poolside than diving into a good book? Summer reading here at Rocky River Public Library is a very big deal. We have generous support from our Friends organization that allows us to offer really great summer reading programming and prizes for all ages. If you’re reading this you already know how rewarding reading is, but to be able to have a little fun and win some neat stuff along the way just makes it that much more exciting.

Prizes

This year our summer reading theme is Universe of Stories, and with the 50th anniversary of the Lunar Landing we just had to dive headfirst into the a space theme. Our weekly baskets all come in a space themed re-usable Baggu, and include $50 gift cards to local retailers, books, and handmade wool dryer balls that we jokingly say look like little planets or moons. But even if you don’t end up winning a basket, just for signing up you can stop by our reference desk and get a custom made moon phase calendar. Theses calendars will help you keep track of the moon phase from June 2019-May 2020.

In addition to these great weekly basket raffles, we are also giving away one grand prize. All entries will be entered into our grand prize raffle for a $100 Visa gift card and a Lego Nasa Apollo Saturn V kit!

How to Participate

We like making participating as simple for you as possible. You can submit an entry for any of the following:

  • Every book you read
  • Every magazine or newspaper you read
  • Attending an event at or sponsored by Rocky River Public Library

Entries can be submitted in person at the Reference desk, or online here.

Winter Book BINGO: Spotlight on Audiobooks

Some of my Favorites

Title details for The Bell Jar by Sylvia Plath - Wait list
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Title details for The Ballad of Black Tom by Victor LaValle - Available
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Title details for The Power by Naomi Alderman - Wait list

LISTS TO GET YOU

STARTED

BookTalk for Adults

In case you missed the BookTalk for Adults program today at the library, here is what we talked about….

The Best Books of 2018 So Far. While there are many excellent books that have been penned thus far in 2018, I managed to widdle the list down to ten. The list spans different genres including fiction, literary fiction, mystery, suspense/thriller and memoir. Here is the list of books we discussed –

The Great Believers by Rebecca Makkai
Us Against You by Fredrik Backman
There, There by Tommy Orange
A Place for Us by Fatima Farheen Mirza
The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah
The President is Missing by Bill Clinton and James Patterson
All the Beautiful Lies by Peter Swanson
The Woman in the Window by A.J.Finn
When Life Gives You Lululemons by Lauren Weisberger
Educated A Memoir by Tara Westover

Our next BookTalk for Adults will be Friday, October 26th at 10AM. Being so close to Halloween we will discuss (you guessed it) Spooky books. Come join us!

What we read this month….

Here are a few of the things your Adult Services crew read in August:

Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

Cover image for This story begins with two main characters who are widowed and have been acquaintances for many years.  Addie Moore decides to make a bold move and pay an unexpected visit to her neighbor in Holt, Colorado, Louis Waters.  Addie is having trouble sleeping and suggests to Louis that it would be a great help if he consented to sleep with her.  What Addie desires is companionship, conversation, and quite simply, someone to share her day with.  Louis decides to give it a try.  What begins as awkward & unsure soon blossoms into a wonderful relationship.  As Addie and Louis slowly begin to build a bond, the residents of Holt, and certain family members are taken aback by such an unconventional relationship for two elderly people.  This is a truly beautiful short novel about late in life love and true companionship.  The story is simple, yet leaves you thinking long after you’ve closed the book. Mary

Us Against You by Fredrik Backman

Cover image for This story picks up where his book Beartown left off.  The story is set in a small town nestled in the forest of Sweden which is trying to move past a scandal surrounding its beloved hockey team.  The story weaves the rebuilding of the people in the town as they try to reclaim their roles and identity.  This is a visceral mending of fences and coming-of-age plot which leave the reader to imagine the cold reality of life.  You’ll walk away from the story feeling raw yet satisfied.  Beth

The Elements of Spellcrafting  by Jason Miller

Cover image for This past month I finished my second book by Jason Miller regarding practical magic and enchantment. The Elements of Spellcrafting is a fun, informative read that has you look at your own spiritual practice and why you may not be getting the results you are looking for. Each chapter is presented with a humorous comic poking fun at the challenges one can face working with a magical practice. The biggest lesson Miller presents is to not let yourself or your ego get in your own way. Great for a seasoned individual or someone new to the practice.  Greg

Glass Empires (Star Trek: Mirror Universe #1)

ICover image for ‘m reading a Star Trek book called Glass Empires. Multiple authors provide three stories in one novel set in the Star Trek Mirror Universe. Even though the Mirror version of Star Trek is about conquering through might rather than exploring the unknown and forming peaceful alliances, these stories still manage to have a humanistic message with certain characters finding the strength to make positive changes to their world. Also I’m nearing the end of the book on CD of Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter. This has been an intriguing story and it is narrated very well by Edoardo Ballerini. It jumps back and forth between Italy in the early 60’s and modern day Hollywood. But it is even more nonlinear than that with a play, the first chapter of an unfinished novel, and the unpublished introduction to another character’s memoir thrown in to give the narrative variety. The cast of characters is fairly complex with more being introduced as the story unravels and many characters not turning out to be exactly who you thought they’d be at first glance. It is about Hollywood as Babylon, the sort of place that is dishonest and ruins lives, and the core group of characters who find themselves strangely thrown together in mostly temporary relationships just trying to make the best of their imperfect lives. Byron

What Should Be Wild by Julia Fine

Cover image for Maisie Cothay was born with a strange curse–her touch brings dead things to life and makes living things die.  She has been raised in seclusion with her father, commanded never to touch anything organic with her bare hands.  When Maisie’s father disappears, she sets off to search for him in the woods that border her home.  She  has always been forbidden to enter this forest because of rumors and wild tales told by villagers of men gone missing or returning with addled minds and memories. Maisie discovers she is one of a long line of cursed women who have a special connection to the wood which claims them in their time of need; however, they are then doomed to live there forever with no hope of change, escape or death. Her ancestors in the wood know that she is the one that can save them, but will Maisie be able to rescue her father or will she be trapped forever in the wood that imprisons her forebears? A very creative tale, although it drags a bit in parts and ends somewhat abruptly. Sara

The Assistant by Bernard Malamud

ICover image for recently reread one of my favorite novels of all time, The Assistant by Bernard Malamud.  Malamud was a master short-story writer, but he was also just a wonderful novelist.  In the 1950’s and 1960’s, he helped to spark a renaissance in Jewish-American literature, along with novelists Saul Bellow and Philip Roth.  The Assistant is about a Jewish grocer in Brooklyn, New York named Morris Bober, an older man with a lot of woes, who hires for unique reasons (no spoilers) a man named Frank Alpine to work for him.  The novel follows what happens after Frank is hired.  Morris’s wife, Ida, and daughter, Helen, are also main characters, and there are a lot of other lesser characters who are very memorable, vivid and alive.  The novel is evocative of the early 1950’s in Brooklyn, and there is much autobiographical material, as Malamud’s own father was a grocer.  The novel is also a profound and lyrical meditation on what it means to be a good person.  Andrew

The Shepherd’s Hut  by Tim Winton

Cover image for Clackton seemingly has very little going for him.  His mother’s recent death left him alone with an abusive father and little prospects for peace or happiness.  When a brutal accident severs the last tie he has to home, Jaxie is compelled to flee into the cruel wilds of Western Australia.  In his rush to escape Jaxie leaves severely underprovisioned for what his trek through this desolate landscape will require.  Though his past has taught him not to trust men, when he encounters Fintan MacGillis, another exile disconnected from the world, he is forced into a situation where his future depends on him.  Together they forge a tenuous friendship as Fintan searches for absolution and Jaxie peace.  Trent

Here’s What We’re Reading in July…

Hide By Matthew Griffin

Cover image for Dealing with the failing health of a partner/spouse is an incredibly difficult and personal experience for anyone, one that can be only compounded by having to keep the true nature of your relationship secret to the world. This is the reality for Wendell and Frank who met right after WWII, fell in love, and made a private life for themselves over the next 60 odd years. This life is threatened when Wendell finds Frank collapsed in the yard. What follows is a novel that goes back and forth from the start of their relationship to the difficulties of the modern day as Frank recovers and Wendell fights to keep it all together. Taxidermy imagery is used throughout which may disturb some readers but it is used as a literary device for identity, superficiality, and the creation of the appearance of artificial life. Greg

 

Two Steps Forward by Graeme C. Simsion

Cover image for This is the story of Zoe Witt who travels to France after the apparent suicide of her husband to visit an old friend. Once there she decides to hike the Camino de Santiago, a 500 mile spiritual walk route that winds through France and Spain. Martin Eden, a recently divorced British engineer, is hiking the Camino de Santiago testing out his one-wheeled cart design. The two cross paths multiple times along the way and become more than friends. This is a heartwarming tale of grief, forgiveness, healing, and determination. Emma

 

How to Read the Bible: A Guide to Scripture Then and Now by James Kugel

Cover image for I’ve been reading a great book about the Bible.  Kugel is an academic, but the book is written for the layperson, and so far it’s been a tour de force.  His approach is to look at stories and passages from the Bible from the perspective of both its ancient interpreters and from modern Biblical scholarship.  This means as a reader sometimes experiencing an intense cognitive dissonance, because the two perspectives seem so deeply divergent (i.e. the thesis that the Bible is divinely inspired, versus the thesis that it was written by four people, the documentary hypothesis).  Kugel himself is an Orthodox Jew, so I’m curious to learn more about how he balances his knowledge of modern scholarship with his faith.  Kugel is an excellent teacher and communicator, and the book is an amazing synthesis of theology, archaeology, history, sociology, psychology, and religious studies.  Andrew

 

Queenpin – Megan Abbott

Cover image for The unnamed narrator, a young woman with limited prospects, takes a job keeping books at a small nightclub.  Soon after she begins practicing some shady accounting, she comes under the scrutiny and then wing of the infamous and ruthless Gloria Denton.  Casinos, racetracks, heists – all the big money in the city runs through Gloria before it makes it’s way to the big bosses out of town.  Gloria will be her access to all the action and the lavish lifestyle to go with it if only she can keep from falling for the wrong guy.  Megan Abbott takes the bones of the same old, time-tested gangster story and gives it new life.  By the end symbols of traditional masculinity are kicked apart and lay shattered and bloody on the floor. Trent

 

The Very Worst Missionary by Jamie Wright

Cover image for In the evangelical church, there is a myth about missionaries: those who do “God’s work” can do no harm. After living in Costa Rica as a missionary for five years, Jamie Wright pulls back the curtain on missionary life, writing about her experiences and observations. She points the finger at the careless and nonsensical ways of “helping” that sending organizations permitted to happen, veiled by the vague language of “loving on people,” “just showing up,” and “hearing from God.” Her stories about mutually exploitative practices, wasted resources, and underequipped ministers were helpful in understanding the gravity of the harm Christian missionaries can do, if not prepared to serve in careful, sensible, and sustainable ways. Even though the content of the book is serious, Jamie’s voice is fun and entertaining, but also scathing – maybe a little like watching a Trevor Noah routine. While I appreciated the foundation that the beginning chapters laid about Jamie’s early years, the final two sections were ultimately the worthwhile ones. Lyndsey

 

The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

Cover image for I loved Ruth Ware’s In a Dark Dark Wood, a gripping psychological thriller that left me hanging every step of the way.  Then I read The Woman in Cabin 10 and was mostly just confused by too many characters.  The Lying Game is the best book from Ruth Ware so far.  Four  girls spent a year together at Salten, a second-rate boarding school  in the English countryside until they are forced to leave to avoid a scandal.  Truth be told, no one is sorry to see them go, as their favorite activity was The Lying Game, a game with complicated rules and scoring systems that involved lying to faculty and boarders alike. The number one rule however was, “Never lie to each other”.  Fifteen years after the girls go their separate ways, three of them receive a text from the fourth saying only, “I need you.”  As if time hasn’t passed, the girls run back to Salten and into a situation that is dark, dangerous and brings to light the fact that someone broke Rule #1.   Fabulous descriptions of the eerie  and dark marshlands  in the waterlogged area near the English Channel perfectly set the tone for the story which is an addicting page turner.  Sara

 

There There by Tommy Orange

Cover image for Tommy Orange’s debut novel There There is a window into the lives of urban Native Americans of Oakland, California. We hear from twelve different characters, young and old, embedded in their heritage and barely aware, as they wind their way through stories steeped in tragedy and despair, hope and family, culminating on the night of an Oakland powwow. Read the prologue if you do nothing else – it’s devastating. Dori

 

Something in the Water by Catherine Steadman

Cover image for A debut psychological thriller and the perfect beach read. Erin, a documentary film maker and her investment banker husband Mark are honeymooning in Bora Bora. This tropical paradise turns into a nightmare when a scuba diving excursion uncovers something sinister in the water. Do Erin and Mark report their finding? Each decision they make after their discovery has dangerous consequences for the young couple. This taut and unsettling  novel is perfect for fans of Ruth Ware and Paula Hawkins. Megan

 

The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto Che Guevara

Cover image for This past month has consisted of doing extra research in order to teach film history to kids/teens in a filmmaking summer camp. As I continue to make an effort to include more diverse voices in my reading choices, I’m now reading The Motorcycle Diaries by Ernesto Che Guevara through Overdrive. It is a relatively short read, which is what I wanted. In quick chapters Che describes the adventures and misadventures that he and a friend from medical school have while travelling through South America. Next I’ll have to watch the movie adaptation with Gael Garcia Bernal. Byron

 

Us Against You (Beartown #2) by Fredrik Backman

Cover image for This is my first read by the popular author Fredrick Backman, and oddly enough, I did NOT read Beartown.  However, the review of the book caught my interest, and I much enjoyed it.  The reader does not have to read Beartown to understand this book.  The beginning does a very good job of concisely wrapping up Beartown, and swiftly picking up where it has left off.  Beartown is populated with a diverse group inhabitants. Some old , some young, some cranky, some hardworking, some who hardly work, and some dreamers.  Something bad has happened in Beartown, and now its residents are divided.  Much talk about the beloved local hockey team and its future is where this book begins. Changes ensue for the hockey team and the town.  However, this book isn’t just about hockey. This book is about life. It has sadness, tension, fierce competition, politics, kindness (sometimes in the most unlikely of places), love & compassion. You don’t have to love hockey to love this book, you just need to love life. Mary