Jojo Rabbit

Sam Rockwell, Taika Waititi, Scarlett Johansson, Stephen Merchant, Alfie Allen, Rebel Wilson, Thomasin McKenzie, and Roman Griffin Davis in Jojo Rabbit (2019)

The topic matter is intended to be unsettling or uncomfortable with this film. It’s a dark comedy where they explore some unsettling historical events, so I’d say it’s not for everyone. I’ve enjoyed Taika Waititi’s films in the past including Hunt for the Wilderpeople and the better known Thor:Ragnarock. I was a bit apprehensive that it would be too comedic, disrespectful, or too sobering which would make it hard to watch. I think it struck the right balance and told us a story about a little boy living in a highly stressful environment, even if he doesn’t see it that way. 

The film starts off with a rather unsettling rendition of the Beatles’ I Want to Hold Your Hand used to introduce the fanaticism that Adolf Hitler elicited by comparing him in a way to the Beatles. We then meet Jojo (Roman Griffin Davis) as he’s talking to his imaginary friend Adolf (Taika Waititi) to psyche himself up for Hitler Youth summer camp. He and other 10-year-old boys and girls including his best friend Yorki (Archie Yates) are going to learn the basics of becoming a Nazi. The boys do various training exercises like learning to shoot, throw grenades, fight, use their knives, and in general just prepare to go to war. As some older boys notice Jojo isn’t hurting anyone in a team battle, they decide to pick on him. 

The older boys try to force Jojo to kill a rabbit and when he refuses, they taunt him with the name “Jojo Rabbit” because he’s afraid like a rabbit. His imaginary friend Adolf and Yorki give him a bit of a pep talk and Jojo enthusiastically runs back during grenade training. Jojo takes a grenade from Captain Klenzendorf (Sam Rockwell). He throws the grenade and it bounces off a tree back at him. Jojo ends up being injured and he wakes up in a hospital to his mother Rosie (Scarlett Johansson) looking at him. Jojo starts working for Captain Klenzendorf as his scars are deemed “too frightening” for the other children. As Jojo arrives home early one day he calls out for his mother and finds Elsa (Thomasin McKenzie) hiding in a secret room. 

This movie really balances its topics and themes well. It’s clear that Jojo is just a boy, but what he’s raised to believe is something terrible. This movie doesn’t make any efforts to excuse his beliefs either, just try to explain them. We see the struggle of the other adults and children in this world who must deal with being in the middle of a war that they seem to be losing. This movie ranges from some silly jokes to some dark moments. I think many would enjoy this film or get something from the messages within. It’s certainly for people who enjoy a bit of history and dark humor. Rated PG-13. 

Ryan 

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