Non-Fiction Roundup – May 2019

Happy May!  Here are some non-fiction titles to whet your readerly appetite, coming out this month.  One click on the title will take you to the catalog.  Happy reading!

Cover image for Cover image for Cover image for

At Home with Muhammad Ali by Hana Ali – Muhammad Ali’s daughter presents a candid and intimate family memoir based on personal recordings he kept throughout his adult life, detailing the everyday adventures their family shared and their collective experiences with pain, laughter and love.

Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination by Brian Jay Jones – A full-scale portrait of Theodor Geisel, best known as American icon Dr. Seuss, shares insights into his successful early career as a radical political cartoonist and the complicated genius that informed his beliefs on such subjects as empathy and environmentalism.

The Making of a Justice by Justice John Paul Stevens – One of the most prominent jurists of our time provides a personal account of life on the Supreme Court that offers a unique understanding of American history. By the author of Fire Chiefs.

Cover image for Cover image for Cover image for

The Castle on Sunset: Life, Death, Love, Art and Scandal at Hollywood’s Chateau Marmont by Shawn Levy – The best-selling author of Rat Pack Confidential presents a deeply researched history of the iconic Hollywood hotel that explores its storied role in wild celebrity revelries, scandalous liaisons and creative breakthroughs.

Comedy Sex God by Pete Holmes – The host of the You Made It Weird podcast and star of HBO’s Crashing describes how an ex’s infidelity transformed his evangelical Christian views, compelling him to embrace a model of faith that incorporates laughter and honest fulfillment.

Furious Hours: Murder, Fraud, and the Last Trial of Harper Lee by Casey Cep – Documents the remarkable story of 1970s Alabama serial killer Willie Maxwell and the true-crime book on the Deep South’s racial politics and justice system that consumed Harper Lee in the years after To Kill a Mockingbird.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s