jump to navigation

What we read this month…. August 29, 2018

Posted by SaraC in Beach Reads, Book Discussion, Book List, Book Review, Genre Book Discussion, Uncategorized.
trackback

Here are a few of the things your Adult Services crew read in August:

Our Souls at Night by Kent Haruf

Cover image for This story begins with two main characters who are widowed and have been acquaintances for many years.  Addie Moore decides to make a bold move and pay an unexpected visit to her neighbor in Holt, Colorado, Louis Waters.  Addie is having trouble sleeping and suggests to Louis that it would be a great help if he consented to sleep with her.  What Addie desires is companionship, conversation, and quite simply, someone to share her day with.  Louis decides to give it a try.  What begins as awkward & unsure soon blossoms into a wonderful relationship.  As Addie and Louis slowly begin to build a bond, the residents of Holt, and certain family members are taken aback by such an unconventional relationship for two elderly people.  This is a truly beautiful short novel about late in life love and true companionship.  The story is simple, yet leaves you thinking long after you’ve closed the book. Mary

Us Against You by Fredrik Backman

Cover image for This story picks up where his book Beartown left off.  The story is set in a small town nestled in the forest of Sweden which is trying to move past a scandal surrounding its beloved hockey team.  The story weaves the rebuilding of the people in the town as they try to reclaim their roles and identity.  This is a visceral mending of fences and coming-of-age plot which leave the reader to imagine the cold reality of life.  You’ll walk away from the story feeling raw yet satisfied.  Beth

The Elements of Spellcrafting  by Jason Miller

Cover image for This past month I finished my second book by Jason Miller regarding practical magic and enchantment. The Elements of Spellcrafting is a fun, informative read that has you look at your own spiritual practice and why you may not be getting the results you are looking for. Each chapter is presented with a humorous comic poking fun at the challenges one can face working with a magical practice. The biggest lesson Miller presents is to not let yourself or your ego get in your own way. Great for a seasoned individual or someone new to the practice.  Greg

Glass Empires (Star Trek: Mirror Universe #1)

ICover image for ‘m reading a Star Trek book called Glass Empires. Multiple authors provide three stories in one novel set in the Star Trek Mirror Universe. Even though the Mirror version of Star Trek is about conquering through might rather than exploring the unknown and forming peaceful alliances, these stories still manage to have a humanistic message with certain characters finding the strength to make positive changes to their world. Also I’m nearing the end of the book on CD of Beautiful Ruins by Jess Walter. This has been an intriguing story and it is narrated very well by Edoardo Ballerini. It jumps back and forth between Italy in the early 60’s and modern day Hollywood. But it is even more nonlinear than that with a play, the first chapter of an unfinished novel, and the unpublished introduction to another character’s memoir thrown in to give the narrative variety. The cast of characters is fairly complex with more being introduced as the story unravels and many characters not turning out to be exactly who you thought they’d be at first glance. It is about Hollywood as Babylon, the sort of place that is dishonest and ruins lives, and the core group of characters who find themselves strangely thrown together in mostly temporary relationships just trying to make the best of their imperfect lives. Byron

What Should Be Wild by Julia Fine

Cover image for Maisie Cothay was born with a strange curse–her touch brings dead things to life and makes living things die.  She has been raised in seclusion with her father, commanded never to touch anything organic with her bare hands.  When Maisie’s father disappears, she sets off to search for him in the woods that border her home.  She  has always been forbidden to enter this forest because of rumors and wild tales told by villagers of men gone missing or returning with addled minds and memories. Maisie discovers she is one of a long line of cursed women who have a special connection to the wood which claims them in their time of need; however, they are then doomed to live there forever with no hope of change, escape or death. Her ancestors in the wood know that she is the one that can save them, but will Maisie be able to rescue her father or will she be trapped forever in the wood that imprisons her forebears? A very creative tale, although it drags a bit in parts and ends somewhat abruptly. Sara

The Assistant by Bernard Malamud

ICover image for recently reread one of my favorite novels of all time, The Assistant by Bernard Malamud.  Malamud was a master short-story writer, but he was also just a wonderful novelist.  In the 1950’s and 1960’s, he helped to spark a renaissance in Jewish-American literature, along with novelists Saul Bellow and Philip Roth.  The Assistant is about a Jewish grocer in Brooklyn, New York named Morris Bober, an older man with a lot of woes, who hires for unique reasons (no spoilers) a man named Frank Alpine to work for him.  The novel follows what happens after Frank is hired.  Morris’s wife, Ida, and daughter, Helen, are also main characters, and there are a lot of other lesser characters who are very memorable, vivid and alive.  The novel is evocative of the early 1950’s in Brooklyn, and there is much autobiographical material, as Malamud’s own father was a grocer.  The novel is also a profound and lyrical meditation on what it means to be a good person.  Andrew

The Shepherd’s Hut  by Tim Winton

Cover image for Clackton seemingly has very little going for him.  His mother’s recent death left him alone with an abusive father and little prospects for peace or happiness.  When a brutal accident severs the last tie he has to home, Jaxie is compelled to flee into the cruel wilds of Western Australia.  In his rush to escape Jaxie leaves severely underprovisioned for what his trek through this desolate landscape will require.  Though his past has taught him not to trust men, when he encounters Fintan MacGillis, another exile disconnected from the world, he is forced into a situation where his future depends on him.  Together they forge a tenuous friendship as Fintan searches for absolution and Jaxie peace.  Trent

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: