Anyone for a Feel-Good Hug?

This was our gentle read slash religious book genre discussion. (You may be thinking, doesn’t she mean Christian fiction? And I would say, “Nope, I’m broadening our horizons and making it ‘religious’ fiction so we can include all kinds of faiths!” We like to be an inclusive group, so don’t you think that makes sense?) And I’d say we wound up with a good mix of gentle vs. religious themes and historical vs. contemporary settings, making for an interesting and wide-ranging discussion. There wasn’t one, big idea that came out of it, but I think now we all have a new appreciation for the variety of stories available in these two categories.

Why not decide for yourself? Take a peek at what we’re saying about the books we read and make up your own mind…

I’m saying this about the book I read:

Courting Trouble by Deeanne Gist is a sweet, funny romance featuring a main character that turns to her faith in time of need. Essie is an old maid in 1894 in a small Texas town but she’s just about given up any hope that she’ll ever have a family of her own. When a drifter comes to town and begins paying her special attention giving Essie hope again. But not all is as it appears and in the end Essie must decide what she wants to compromise about herself, if anything at all.

Evelyn is saying this about the books she read:

Collins, Brandilyn — Brink of Death (Hidden Faces #1)

Soon after Annie Kingston moves her family to the small town of Grove Landing, California, her neighbor is killed in a break-in. Erin, the twelve-year-old daughter of the neighbor sees the killer but is too traumatized to offer up a description. Because Erin is friends with Annie’s daughter, Annie, who is a courtroom sketch artist, offers to help Erin create a drawing of the killer. Erin’s father’s faith during this whole ordeal amazes the nonbeliever Annie and, as she tries to help Erin, she finds herself asking God for help.

Ferrell, Miralee — Love Finds You in Last Chance California

After the death of her father, Alexia Travers must manage the family horse ranch—not an easy task in 1877 California. Despite her best efforts, everything seems to go wrong. Some of the ranch hands refuse to work for a woman boss, a fence is cut and horses are stolen, even the gold her father received from the bank after mortgaging the ranch is missing. Alex offers widower-newcomer Justin Phillips a job after he arrives in Last Chance with his young son. He seems like a good man, but he has secrets he seems unwilling to share. He is a man of strong faith, but will he be able to help Alex learn to depend on God? A nice, historical/western romance that has likeable and engaging characters and an interesting story line; the author actually visited the present site (a ghost town) of Last Chance, California as part of her research.

Janet is saying this about the book she read:

Any Minute by Joyce Meyer centers on the main character, Sarah Harper. Even though Sarah is a wife, mother, daughter and career woman, her career receives the majority of her attention. Unfortunately it takes a life-threatening accident to get Sarah to take a good look at herself and her priorities.

Julie is saying this about the book she read:

I read Celebrations at Thrush Green by one of the masters of gentle reads, Dora Jessie Saint, aka. Miss Read. In this installment of the Thrush Green series residents are arranging festivities to celebrate the 100 years since the founding of both the town school and a mission in Africa set up by one of the village’s own. This isn’t a book with a great deal of pathos or action, but something to slip into if you want to feel a bit less hectic and bit warmer inside.

Carol is saying this about the book she read:

My gentle reads pick was Angela Hunt’s Doesn’t She Look Natural, the first book in her Fairlawn trilogy. This is definitely a work of Christian fiction as God and prayer are central to the plot. A newly divorced mother of two, Jennifer Graham, moves in with her mother in Virginia when her husband leaves her for the nanny. Just as Jennifer is at her breaking point, fate intervenes and Jennifer learns that she has inherited a historic Victorian home in Mt. Dora, Florida–only to discover, it’s also a funeral parlor. Jennifer puts her fate in the hands of God, who she believes has a greater plan for her life. Her only complaint: Does this plan really include running a funeral home?

Though a bit predictable, this novel celebrates the mortician ministry and its effect on loved ones left behind. Despite being filled with some gruesome details about the funeral parlor business, the supporting cast (including Joella and her society of Red Hatters) in this book were the reasons I kept reading. If this sounds like your cup of tea, you’ll be happy we also own books two and three in the series: She Always Wore Red and She’s In A Better Place.

Rosemary is saying this about the book she read:

Tyler’s Rowby Miss Read is a lovely and gentle story. Peter and Diana Hale are smitten with four row houses in the English countryside. Their ultimate plan is to remodel the houses into one beautiful home for their retirement. Of course, their dreams take much longer to achieve than they ever thought possible. The renters in two of the houses are cantankerous and not about to move to other living quarters. Peter and Diana prevail by drawing on their own good humor and the assistance of the Fairacre villagers.

Ann is saying this about the book she read:

Where You Once BelongedBy Kent Haruf

The narrative of small town bad boy, Jack Burdette told by one of the fellow townsfolk of Holt, Colorado. Jack, an unruly kid goes on to become a high school football star, but trouble follows him, and as a grown man when he marries a woman he met at a weekend convention, and then later shocks the town by committing a sinister crime, he becomes the town pariah. DISCLAIMER: This book is not a very gentle read. A better choice for a more gentle and uplifting story is Haruf’s Plainsong and it’s sequel Eventide, both set in that same small town of Holt, Colorado.

Emma is saying this about the book she read:

The Power and the Glory by Graham Greene is the story of an unnamed Mexican “whiskey priest” on the run for eight years. Christianity has been outlawed by the state. All priests must renounce their faith, get married, flee or face execution. Although seemingly broken down by his love of the bottle, he remains true to his calling. Finally giving into the Mexican Government’s decree that all priests leave the country, he complies but is called back to hear a final confession. Is this his final act of faith?

Megan is saying this about the book she read:

Lucky T by Kate Brian

Carrie has always counted on her special T-shirt to bring her luck and it has never failed her. She has aced tests, won lead roles in school plays, and found a very cute boyfriend, all with the help of her lucky T. When her mother accidentally donates the shirt to Help India Carrie’s luck takes an immediate turn for the worse. Determined to get back her shirt, her luck, and her charmed life Carrie sets off to India to find the lucky shirt. The odds are against her, but with the help of some new friends Carrie begins a life changing journey. This is a sweet coming of age story with hints of comedy and romance suitable for teens of all ages.

Dori is saying this about the book she read:

In Recipes from the Dumpby Abigail Stone, single mother Gabby Fulbriten lives near the dump in a small town in Vermont. Intelligent, funny and honest, she listens to Shakespeare and frets about her lack of money and a man, about her weight and the environment. Interspersed are recipes for food and for life, such as ‘Life Juice’ and ‘Just Desserts’. Gabby may not find all she’s looking for, but she’s an interesting character to spend an afternoon with.

Donna is saying this about the book she read:

Aunt Dimity Slays the Dragonby Nancy Atherton is the fourteenth mystery in this cozy English series featuring Aunt Dimity, the paranormal detective. Lori Shepherd and her husband and twin sons live in a small English village in the Cotswolds. Aunt Dimity is Lori’s mother deceased friend who communicates with her by writing in a magical blue notebook. Together, they solve the mysteries surrounding Finch and the English countryside. Lori and the villagers are excited to learn that a Renaissance Faire plans to open nearby for the summer. After a series of accidents mar the opening of the Faire, Lori begins to fear that someone wants to kill King Wilfred the Good, the Faire’s organizer. Will Lori and Aunt Dimity be able to stop a murder before it happens?

Good variety, right? Next time things won’t be quite so … kind or … caring. Next up? Horror of horrors, it’s the horror genre! We’ll be reading frightening stories, often with supernatural or occult elements, and they may cause us to have terrified responses to a world gone awry. So, what do you think? Are you ready to sleep with the lights on for a while? Are you going to read a horror book with us? Edgar Allan Poe counts, if that makes you feel better?

—Stacey

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